Michael Husting

M, b. 18 March 1784, d. 17 April 1863
Reference=0054.0
     He was born on 18 March 1784 at Fischbach, Mersch, Luxembourg.1 He was the son of Johan Joseph Husting and Elisabeth Binsfeld.1

Michael Husting married Barbara Becker on 14 March 1814 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.2

Michael Husting served served under Napolean and was captured, a prisoner of war in Spain. circa 1815 at Spain.3 THE HUSTING FAMILY

     The distinctive impress of the Husting family upon the social and civic life of that section of the Rock River valley comprehended in Dodge county has been such that it is regarded as but proper here to set out somewhat in detail something of the origin of this family in Wisconsin and of the services of its members to the community. Elsewhere in this work there is presented a fitting tribute to the memory of the late Hon. Paul O. Husting, United states senator from the state of Wisconsin, whose tragic death while hunting in the woods of upper Wisconsin in the fall of 1917, proved so great a shock not only to the people of his native state but to the country at large. Senator Husting was the second in order of birth of the eight children, sven sons and a daughter, born to Jean Pierre and Mary Magdelene (Juneau) Husting, then residents of Fond du Lac, who later made their home at Mayville in Dodge county, and the latter of whom, born at Milwaukee, March 29, 1841, was the fourth youngest in order of birth of the sixteen children born to Solomon and Josette (Vieu) Juneau, the latter of whom was a daughter of Jacques Vieu, a French trader in the Green Bay settlement, and his Indian wife. She was born in 1804 and it has been written of her that "she grew up without educational advantages and became a wife when she was fifteen years of age. Lacking education, she was nevertheless a woman of character and good natural endowments and was greatly esteemed among the pioneers for her kindliness and generous hospitality. Having in her veins a trace of Indian blood and having through life-long association with them become thoroughly familiar with their language, customs and habits, she acquired a wonderful influence over the Indians, and this influence was always used to foster the interests of the white settlers and promote the advancement of civilization." This earnest and helpful personal factor in the days of the beginning of a social order in the Milwaukee settlement and who died in that city in 1855, wa a grandniece of La Farrine, a noted chief of the Menominees, and it is recorded that on more than one occasion she saved the lives of the first settlers of that section who would otherwise have fallen victims to Indian vengeance.
     Solomon Juneau's name id inseperably connected with the name of the city of Milwaukee, for he was the founder of the town. It was he who made the first survey of the village, who became its first president, was the first postmaster, donated the first public square out of the large tract of land he had entered there at the mouth of the river at the site of the Indian village, and later on, when th village had grown to a city, was its first mayor. He entered that place as a trader in the employ of the American Fur Company in September, 1818, and nearly all of the remainder of his life was spent in the town he founded, his death occurring in 1856, the year following the death of his wife Josette. The latter's father, Jacques Vieu, was a French Canadian, born in Montreal, May 5, 1757, and early became employed in the Indian trade, first heard of at Mackinaw and next in Green Bay. He became expert in the fur trade, learning the language of many tribes and acquiring an extensive acquaintance with the chiefs. His success attracted the attention of John Jacob Astor and the agents of the American Fur Company and he presently became established in a trading post about two miles up the Menominee, where the Green Bay trail crossed the river. Jacques Vieu married a daughter of a sister of the famous chief Puch-wau-she-gun and they had eleven children, all of whom were born in Green Bay save the last two, who were born in Milwaukee. Of these Mrs. Josette Vieu was the third in order of birth. Jacques Vieu died in 1853, when ninety-six years of age and his widow long survived him, living to the great age of one hundred and five years.
     Laurent Solomon Juneau, whose familiar signature in the early records of Milwaukee was simply " S. Juneau," and who always was known by his second name of Solomon, was born in L'Assumption parish a few miles out of the city of Montreal, August 9, 1793, and was of French parentage. Comparison of old records and books show that his name was variously spelled as Juno, Junot, Juneau, Jeauno and Juneaux, but Juneau was his own way of spelling it and the one that was in use by his family. His baptismal certificate, written by the parish priest in French, is translated as follows: "The ninth day of August, 1793, by us subscribed, priest of the parish of Repentiguy, Lower Canada, was baptized Laurent Solomon, born this day, afternoon, of the legitimate marriage of Francis Juno, surnamed La Tulipe, and Maria Galeeno; both not knowing how to sing their names, were interrogated pursuant to ordinances. (Signed) L's Lamottes, priest." Juneau's certificate of naturalization, signed by a clerk of the circuit court of the United States, was issued in the town of Green Bay, Brown county, in the territory of Michigan, June 15, 1831, so that it appears that he did not become a citizen of the United States until thirteen years after taking up his residence on this side. He is first heard of in the west in September, 1816, at mackinaw, where he met for the first time his future father-in-law, Jacques Vieu, and entered the latter's employ as a clerk.
     As noted above, it was in September, 1818, that Juneau, after working for two years for Vieu at Green Bay, became established as the agent of the American Fur Company at the site of the future city of Milwaukee. Two years later (1820) he married Vieu's daughter Josette. For two years after his marriage he maintained his wife in the Vieu settlement on the Menominee ands then, in 1822, moved into the cabin which became historic as his first home on the site of the present city of Milwaukee. In 1835, he built a frame building and during the later years of their lives he and his wife had their home in a more pretentious residence at the corner of Juneau street and Milwaukee avenue. It has been written of Solomon Juneau that "in personal appearance he was a remarkably fine looking man, both in his early life and in his manhood," and portraits of him which appear in the old books justify this statement. "Standing full six feet in height, straight as an arrow, broad chested and of splendid muscular development, he had black curly hair, clear, dark eyes and a face that would have attracted attention in any assemblage of men. His fine physique, his courage, tact and good judgement made him a favorite with the Indians from the start, and in a few years he had acquired an almost unbounded influence over those who laid claim to the lands of this region, or who were attracted to his trading post at Milwaukee." For some years after Milwaukee was laid out Juneau was prosperous in a financial way, his operations both as a merchant and in real estate proving exceedingly profitable. A vast fortune was within his grasp, but nature and education had not fitted him to retain it. Gradually his possessions slipped away from him and passed into the hands of shrewder men, and on the 14th of November, 1856, he died, a comparatively poor man, he then being on a trip to Shawano to make a settlement with the Indians. One who was present at his death bed wrote that after giving some final instructions regarding the disposition of his estate and after receiving the last consoling rites of his church, a priest having been summoned, he "immediately afterward directed his eyes aloft and crossing his hands upon his breast, with a sigh of profound and peaceful languor, he breathed: 'I come to rejoin you, my wife.' The slumbers of syncope supervened as the night moved on and at twenty minutes after two a.m., Solomon Juneau breathed his last." The Indians selected the place for the temporary burial of their friend, a site adjoining their own burial ground overlooking the Wolf, and hundreds of the tribesmen attended this burial, attesting in the most affecting manner their profoundest respect and deep love for the deceased. Not long afterward the body was removed to Milwaukee and after an imposing ceremony in the cathedral was interred in the old Spring street cemetery, from which it was later removed to Calvary cemetery, where it now rests, and on a fine eminence in beautiful Juneau park, overlooking the city which he founded, stands a commanding bronze statue of Solomon Juneau, a perpetual memorial of the people in behalf of this able pioneer.
     Of the sixteen children born to Solomon Juneau and Josette Juneau, as has been noted above, Mrs. Mary Magdelene Husting was the fourth youngest and was fifteen years of age when her father died. In the previous year, 1855, she had been bereaved by the death of mother. She was a good student and when nineteen years of age became a teacher in the schools if the town of Theresa, Dodge county, which place had been named in honor of her eldest sister, Theresa, and it was there on February 16, 1863, in the home of her eldest brother, Narcisse M. Juneau, that she married Jean Pierre Husting. two of Mrs. Husting's brothers, Narcisse and Paul Juneau, served as members of Wisconsin's first legislature after the state's admission to the Union in 1848 and Paul Juneau was the founder of the town which bears his name in Dodge county. Her other brothers and sisters were Frank, Harriet, Charlotte, Margaret, Eugene, Mathilda, Ellen, Olive, Mary Elizabeth, Bonduel, Louis and two who died in early childhood.
     Jean Pierre Husting, who died at his home in Mayville, June 27, 1924, was born in the grand duchy of Luxemburg, August 4, 1838, son of Michael and Anna Husting, and was seventeen years of age when in 1855 he came to this country with his parents and his three sisters, Anna, Mary and Susanne, the family rejoining, in Dodge county, Wisconsin, the two elder sons, Theodore and Nicholas Husting, who had some time before effected a settlement here. Not long after his arrival Jean Husting entered the employ of a jeweler at Fond du Lac and the remainder of his active life was spent as a merchant and then became engaged in business in Fond du Lac. In 1876 he moved with his family to Mayville and during the period of his residence there took an active part in public affairs, serving as treasurer of the school district and also for some time as postmaster of the town. When Mr. and Mrs. Husting celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, February 16, 1913, an occasion that was made one of much felicitation and congratulation on the part of their many friends, there was printed for private circulation, under the direction of their children, a charming little booklet under the title "Husting Golden Jubilee" and dedicated to "Our beloved mother and father, whose indulgence, tenderness and self-sacrifice towards us since our births, fill our hearts with devotion and gratitude." This booklet, which carries much of interest concerning the Husting family, is treasured in many a home within the circle of that family's acquaintance, and the ample portraiture and information there carried will be of inestimable value to future generations of this interesting family.
     To Jean Pierre and Mary Magdelene (Juneau) Husting were born eight children, seven sons and one daughter, namely: Charles Ottomar,who was born on November 12, 1864 and died August 27, 1918; Paul Oscar Adolph, born April 25, 1866, concerning whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work; Maximillian Roland, born April 17, 1868; Johanna Isabelle, May 23, 1870; Leopoldus Franziscus, July 23, 1872; Bonduel Juneau, June 23, 1874; Gustav Binsfeld, March 17, 1876, and Berthold Juneau, born in Mayville, March 6, 1878. All of these children save the last named were born in Fond du Lac. Charles O. Husting, oldest of the family, married Abbie Costello of Columbus, Nebraska, in 1891, and has for years been engaged in the insurance business at Beaver Dam, Dodge county. Maximillian R. Husting early became engages in newspaper work and has for years been located at Fargo, North Dakota. In 1896 he married Miss Anna Tscharner of Alma, Wisconsin, and they have a daughter, Lucille. Miss Johanne Isabelle Husting was educated in St. Catherine's Academy for Girls at Racine and was for some time employed in the post office at Mayville. In 1895 she married Courtney W. lamoreaux, who afterward became county judge, and they have two daughters, Vera Rosalind and Marion. Leopoldus F. Husting, who since the days of his youth has been engaged in railway service, now residing at Madison, Wisconsin, married Miss Nellie Sommers of Brillion and had eight children, Juneau, Charles, Francis, Josette Magdelene and Mary Josephine (towns), Maurice, Jay P. and one who died in infancy. Bonduel A. Husting, who for many years has engaged in the practice of law in Fond du Lac, married Miss Kate Anderson of Eldorado, Wisconsin, in 1908, and has four children, Helen, Isabelle, Margharet and John Pierre. Gustav B. Husting, who also is engages in law practice, in association with his brother Berthold at Mayville, studied in the Law School of the University of Wisconsin and in 1903 was admitted ot the bar. He was engaged in practice at Park Falls and in Kaukauna until 1911, when he formed a partnership with his brother, the late senator Paul O. Husting, at Mayville and has since been in practice there. In 1907 he married Miss Paula Ruedebusch, a member of one of the oldest families of the Mayville neighborhood, and they have five children, Paul Alurent, Vivian, Maybelle, Mary, Louise and Elizabeth Jeanette. Berthold J. Husting was graduated from the Law School of the University of Wisconsin in 1900 and has since been engaged in practice as a member of the law firm of Husting & Husting at Mayville. During his college days he was a "star" on the athletic field, both in baseball and football, and afterward was for some time a professional ball player, being a member of the Philadelphia team when it won the league pennant in 1902. In that same year he married a high school classmate, Miss Agnes Sternberger of Mayville, and they have three children, Suzanne Madelaine, John Jakob Marzell and Constance.4

Michael Husting married Anna Maria (Binsfeld) Cloos, daughter of Caroli Cloos and Barbe Munhowen Mahovald, on 26 August 1824 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1,2,5

Michael Husting and Anna Maria (Binsfeld) Cloos immigrated on 20 June 1855 to New York City, New York; Michael Husting immigrated with his second wife and family to New York, then on to Theresa in Dodge County Wisconsin. They sailed on the "John Hancock" which departed from Le Havre, France on 28 Apr 1855 and arrived to New York City on 20 Jun 1855.2,3,6

Michael Husting died on 17 April 1863 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, at age 79.1,2,7,8

Michael Husting was buried at St. Theresa's Catholic Cemetery after 17 April 1863 at Theresa, Wisconsin; St. Theresa Catholic Cemetary, in Sec 10, SE in Theresa. Cemetary on a hill overlooking the Rock River in the east part of the Village.

Children of Michael Husting and Barbara Becker

Children of Michael Husting and Anna Maria (Binsfeld) Cloos

Citations

  1. [S41] Christopher S. Miasnik, "Pedigree Chart for Dana Kellerman", Chart 13.
  2. [S161] Husting History.
  3. [S165] Eugene E. Husting Will: 21 March 1953.
  4. [S187] Unknown author.
  5. [S276] IGI Index, 22 Mar 1999.
  6. [S324] John Hancock, 28 Apr 1855.
  7. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  8. [S369] St. Theresa's Catholic cemetery, Theresa, Wisconsin cemetery markers.

N.B. (Juneau) Husting

M, b. 23 June 1899, d. 15 December 1971
Reference=0027.7.5.4
     He was born on 23 June 1899.1 He was the son of Leopoldus Franziscus Husting and Nellie Sommers.2

N.B. (Juneau) Husting married Anne Steidinger.2

N.B. (Juneau) Husting died on 15 December 1971 at age 72.1

Child of N.B. (Juneau) Husting and Anne Steidinger

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Nicholas Husting

M, b. 14 August 1825, d. 24 November 1896
Reference=0027.3
     He was born on 14 August 1825 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1,2 He was the son of Michael Husting and Anna Maria (Binsfeld) Cloos.

Nicholas Husting married Marianne Anne Faber on 9 February 1850 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1

Nicholas Husting and Eugene Husting lived between 1855 and 1880 in Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin; Eugene Husting was living with his parents and thier family in 1880.3,4

Nicholas Husting and Marianne Anne Faber immigrated on 28 April 1855 to New York, New York from Le Havre, France; The John Hancock left Le Havre on April, 28 1855, and docked in New York on June 20, 1855.5

Nicholas Husting was naturalized on 30 October 1855 at Dodge County, Wisconsin.2

Nicholas Husting witnessed the marriage of John Langenbach and Marie (Mary) Husting on 4 May 1856 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin; The other witness was Peter Quast and Nicolas Husting.1,6

Nicholas Husting witnessed the baptism of Genevieve Phoebe Lanners on 22 April 1858 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin; Her other Baptismal Sponsor was Genofeva Schaetzle.6 He was New Tag on 15 August 1860 at Wistnessed the baptism of Albertum Kuhn, Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.6

Nicholas Husting witnessed the marriage of James Kraemer and Susanne Husting on 18 September 1862 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin.6

Nicholas Husting witnessed the baptism of Paul Langenbach on 6 December 1878 at Theresa.6 He Saloon keeper in 1880 at Theresa, Wisconsin.3

Nicholas Husting witnessed the baptism of Maria Alexia Weber on 28 August 1880 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin; Sponsors: Maria Weber & N. Husting.6

Nicholas Husting was buried at Union Cemetery in November 1896 at Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin.1

Nicholas Husting died on 24 November 1896 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, at age 71.4,1,7

The following was printed in the Juneau Telephone on 4 Dec 1896:
     HUSTING--Nicholas Husting, one of the pioneer settlers of Dodge county, died at Theresa, Nov. 24, 1896, at the age of 73 years.

     The following obituary also appeared on behalf of Mr. Husting in an unknown newspaper around this time.
     Nicholaus Husting
     The pitiless prince of shadows, has claimed another death, and again the spirit of another great man has left us for a better place, namely, Mic. Husting of Theresa. Mr. Husting was born on 15th of August 1826 in Lintgen, parish of Mersch in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, his age being 70 years four months and nine days. He married in the old country to Marian Faber from the village of Ettelbruck in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. This couple immigrated to America in 1855 and in that same year settled in Theresa, Wis., the place where he died. He was an engineer of the steammill owned by the late Solomon Juneau, the founder of Milwaukee, at this occupation he worked (somewhere around 30 years). This great man had suffered heart problems, and water on the heart, and the sickness took over him on Thursday at 4 in the afternoon. He is survived by his wife, two sons Victor Husting of West Bend and Carl Husting of New Hampton, Iowa., two daughters, Mrs. Gebhard Weber and Mrs. Adolph Fickert of Theresa, also surviving him is a daughter-in-law of Eugene Husting in West Bend. In June of 1895 Eugene Husting died at his hotel the "Rock River House," which was a tragic loss. He is survived by brothers and sisters; John P. Husting, Mrs. John Langenbach and the widow Anna Lanners all of Mayville, and Mrs. Susanna Kräjmer, widow of Fond du Lac. THe burial is today, Friday afternoon at Union Cemetery in Theresa. The survivors receive our deepest condolences in this difficult period.8

Children of Nicholas Husting and Marianne Anne Faber

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S164] Naturalization Record, 30 Oct 1855.
  3. [S347] 1880 Census, Nicolas Husting household.
  4. [S146] Homer Bishop Hubbell History of Dodge County.
  5. [S324] John Hancock, 28 Apr 1855.
  6. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  7. [S184] Dodge Death Registration.
  8. [S78] Juneau, Wisconsin, Telephone, 4 Dec 1896.

Nicholas Paul Husting1

M, b. 1 April 1841, d. 21 August 1911
Reference=0027.2.1
     He was born on 1 April 1841 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1 He was the son of Theodore Husting and Susanne Engel.1

Nicholas Paul Husting married Maria Elizabeth Arents.1

Nicholas Paul Husting died on 21 August 1911 at St. Paul, Minnesota, at age 70;
The Hastings Gazette printed the following death announcement:
     Mr. N.P. Husting, formerly of this county, died in St. Paul on Tuesday, aged seventy four years. The funeral was held from St. Matthews Church yesterday, at nine a.m., with interment at Calvary.1,2

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 26 Aug 1911.
  3. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Nicolas Husting1

M, b. 14 September 1842
Reference=0027.2.2
     He was born on 14 September 1842 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1 He was the son of Theodore Husting and Susanne Engel.1

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.

Oscar T. Husting1

M, b. 30 December 1875, d. 3 December 1948
Reference=0027.2.5.5
     He was born on 30 December 1875.2 He was the son of Eugene Louis Husting and Bertha A. Altpeter.1

Oscar T. Husting married Anna Hassmann.3

Oscar T. Husting died on 3 December 1948 at age 72.2

Child of Oscar T. Husting and Anna Hassmann

Citations

  1. [S157] Hartford Times Press, 1 Dec 1916.
  2. [S161] Husting History.
  3. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Otto C. Husting

M, b. 12 November 1864, d. 27 August 1918
Reference=0027.7.1
      Otto C. Husting was also known as Charles Ottomar. He was born on 12 November 1864 at Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. He was the son of Jean Pierre Husting and Mary Magdalene Juneau.1 He lived in 1876 in Mayville, Dodge County, Wisconsin.

Otto C. Husting witnessed the marriage of Luarent S Keeley and Susanna Bertha Langenbach on 9 August 1892 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin.2,3,4

Otto C. Husting married Abbie Costello, daughter of Miles Costello, on 18 December 1896.1

Otto C. Husting died on 27 August 1918 at age 53.5,6

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.
  2. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  3. [S340] Elizabeth Herzfeld, "Herzfeld Research," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 29 Mar 2007.
  4. [S146] Homer Bishop Hubbell History of Dodge County, pg. 367.
  5. [S129] Fond du Lac Reporter, 14 Apr 1924.
  6. [S325] "Mayville Banner", Ancestral File, 29 Aug 1918.

Paul Husting

M, b. 3 June 1908
Reference=0027.7.7.3
     He was born on 3 June 1908.1 He is the son of Gustav Binsfeld Husting and Paula Ruedebusch.2 He lived in 1928 in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.3

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.
  3. [S308] Fond du Lac Directory 1928.

Paul Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.1.4
     He is the son of Nicholas Paul Husting and Maria Elizabeth Arents.1

Paul Husting married Catherine Boland.1

Child of Paul Husting and Catherine Boland

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Paul Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.6.5.1
     He is the son of Peter M. Husting and Elizabeth Kiemen.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Paul John Hilary Husting1

M, b. 7 July 1914
Reference=0027.3.2.2.2
     Paul John Hilary Husting married Margaret Kostanzer.2 He was born on 7 July 1914 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.1 He is the son of Walter Eugene Husting and Corina Gardien.1

Paul John Hilary Husting was baptized on 12 July 1914 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States. Baptismal sponsors were Hilary and Augusta Haessly.1

Children of Paul John Hilary Husting and Margaret Kostanzer

Citations

  1. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  2. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Paul Oscar Adolph Husting

M, b. 25 April 1866, d. 21 October 1917
Reference=0027.7.2
      The following biography of Paul O. Husting was printed in the Wisconsin Blue Book:

Thirteenth Senatorial District. Dodge County. Population, 1900 -
46,631. (p. 1130)

PAUL O. HUSTING (Dem.) was born at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, on April
25th, 1866, a son of John P. Husting and Mary M. Husting nee Juneau,
the latter being the daughter of Solomon Juneau, the founder of
Milwaukee. He removed with his parents to Mayville, Wisconsin, in the
year 1876. Received a common school education. Left school in his
seventeenth year and became successively clerk in general store,
railway postal clerk, and mailing clerk and later promoted to
assistant bookkeeper in the office of the secretary of state. Entered
the law school of the University of Wisconsin and passed the state bar
examination and was admitted to the bar in 1895. Began the practice of
law alone at Mayville immediately thereafter and in 1897 associated
himself with C. W. Lamoreux under the firm name of Lamoreux & Husting
which still exists. Was elected District Attorney of Dodge County in
1902 and was re-elected in 1904. Was elected to the Senate in 1906
receiving 4,646 votes against 2,746 for Leon Reible (Rep.) and 124 for
G. A. Paddock (Pro.).1


The following biography was printed in the Dictionary of American Biography, Memorial Addresses:
Husting, Paul Oscar, 1866-1917
Senate Years of Service: 1915-1917
Party: Democrat
     Husting, Paul Oscar, a Senator from Wisconsin; born in Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, April 25, 1866; moved with his parents to Mayville, Wis., in 1876; attended the public schools and the law school of the Univeristy of Wisconsin at Madison; was admitted to the bar in 1895 and commenced practice in Mayville, Wis; district attorney of Dodge County 1902-1906; member, State senate 1907-1913; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1914 and served from March 4, 1915, until his accidental death while duck hunting on Rush Lake, near Picketts, Wis., on Oct. 21, 1917; chairman, Committee to Investigate Trespassers Upon Indian Land (Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Congresses), Committee on Fisheries (Sixty-fifth Congress); interment in Graceland Cemetery, Mayville, Wis.2

Paul Oscar Adolph Husting was also known as Paul J.3 He was born on 25 April 1866 at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.4 He was the son of Jean Pierre Husting and Mary Magdalene Juneau.5 He was educated at an unknown place in 1895 in an unknown place . In 1895, Paul J. Husting was admitted to the bar.4 He an unknown place In the first direct elections of a U.S. senator in Wisconsin, the people chose Paul J. Husting in 1914 to serve the 1915-1921 term, although his 1917 death cut short his tenure in office. in 1914 at Wisconsin.4

Paul Oscar Adolph Husting died on 21 October 1917 at Ripon, Wisconsin, at age 51; He died on Rush Lake.4

The following obituary was printed in The Daily Commonwealth on 22 Oct 1917:
Senator Husting Dead; Body Brought Here;Well Known Statesman Dies; Gunshot Wound is Fatal
     "Tell them I did the best I knew how."
     These were the dying words of United States Senator Paul O. Husting as he lay mortally wounded in a hunting skiff yesterday afternoon at Rush Lake, where he had been encamped two weeks on a duck hunting expedition. The Senator was being carried from the shore of the lake to the home of C. A. Blackburn, a quarter of a mile from the shore.
     "I am fatally hurt," he said to one of the men pulling at the side of a wagon into which the skiff had been placed.
     "You must not talk like that" said the man. "Your family needs you and the nation cannot afford to lose you." The last audible words of the Senator were as above in response to that statement.
          Death Comes at 10:45
     Senator Husting was fatally shot at 4:15 o'clock Sunday afternoon, Oct. 21. He died in the Blackburn residence at 10:45 in the presence of his three brothers, Gustav, of Mayville, in whose hands the gun was at the time of the accident, B. J. Husting of Mayville, and B. A. Husting of Fond du Lac, Dr. Miles of Ripon, and Dr. A. E. Backhuber of Mayville, M. K. Raidy of Fond du Lac, and members of the Blackburn family.
     The Senator was met by men from the Blackburn home at the shore of the lake, absolved his brother of all blame for the accident. He said he alone was responsible for it. He realized from the first that he was soon to die. "The end is not far away," he remarked to the men at his side.
     Details of the accident became known at midnight last night when the body was brought to Fond du Lac in a motor hearse and taken to the Hardgrove & Gordon undertaking parlors. B. J. Husting spoke for Gustav, who was prostrated by the accident as follows:
          Visit to the Lake
     "The Senator has been staying at the Blue Wing Hunting Club's home, of which he is a member, for the past two weeks. He has not been feeling well of late and at his suggestion he took this means of building up again in order to return to work. We had arranged it among us brothers to be with him at the lake so that he would not be alone. I was down there Tuesday, and when I went back to Mayville, Gustav went up to the lake and took my place. Gustav planned to come home Saturday, but as all had left the clubhouse the Senator prevailed upon him to remain over Sunday, as Attorney B. A. Husting of Fond du Lac planned to make a trip to the lake this week.
     "Yesterday being a nice day, Senator Husting and Gustav went out to hunt ducks. They were in seperate boats, and were occupying one blind. The Senator said to Gustav that he would keep watch over the decoys, and when the ducks appeared he would give Gustav the signal to shoot. They were about ten feet apart, with Paul in front, and being in the blind were more or less obscured. The arrangement of the boats was unusual. I don't ever know of Paul doing that before.
          Gave Signal to Shoot
     "After they had been on cover for a short time a flock of eight mallards dropped over the decoys. Paul whispered to Gustav to shoot. At almost the same moment Gustav fired, Paul stood up. The charge struck him full in the back. He fell face foremost in the skiff. Gustav immediately went to his assistance. Being nearer to the Blackburn home that the clubhouse, which was then empty, he made for the east shore opposite the Blackburn residence. Soon assistance was at the shore. The Senator had lost much blood through hemorrhages. It was impossible to move him, so a wagon was drawn up and the skiff loaded into it. Once at the house, assistance was summoned from Ripon, Fond du Lac, and Mayville. Four doctors were on hand in a short time. They could do nothing for him and he expired at 10:45. The body was placed in a truck and taken to Rosendale, where it was met by undertakers from Fond du Lac. At 2 o'clock the body was in Fond du Lac.
          Doctor Tells of Wounds
     Dr. H. E. Twohig, speaking of the wound said that it was instantly fatal. "He was beyond help the moment he was shot," said the doctor. "Had it been possible to place him upon an operating table immediately after the accident, nothing could have been done to even prolong life. The shot entered the back under the left shoulder blade, an inch from the middle. The hole was about the size of a man's wrist, with no small wounds about indicating that the charge was fired from about the distance of ten feet. There was a serious internal hemorrhage, and soce external. The left lung was completely broken down. There was no attempt to probe for shot. It was widely scattered in the chest, with the wads from the shells imbedded in a hard ball in the pit of the left arm. The heart, it appears, was not seriously injured."
     As soon as the Senator was brought into the Blackburn house he was divested of his clothing, and efforts were made, pending the arrival of the doctors, to staunch the flow of blood. After about three hours, the Senator, though too weak to speak during this period, lapsed into a comatose condition. His pulse was barely discernable shortly after 8 o'clock.
          Lake a Large Marsh
     Rush Lake, where the tragic affair took place, is a low, marshy plat of land some four miles long and averaging two miles wide. It is filled with rushes and lilly pads. Some years ago the Blue Wing Hunting Club was organized among sportsmen of Fond du Lac and Mayville, the Senator among them. They had moved up to Rush Lake when the hunting became poor at Horicon marsh. The clubhouse is on the west side of the lake while the blind in which the Senator and his brother were hunting was located well toward the east side. For this reason it was easier for Gustav to tow the boat to the Blackburn residence.
          Funeral on Wednesday
     The body of the Senator was sent to Mayville via the St. Paul at 3 o'clock this afternoon. The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning from the residence of his only sister Mrs. C. W. Lamoreaux , widow of the late Judge Lamoreaux of Dodge County.
     The settling of the tragedy which robbed the nation of one of its most patriotic and virulent spokemen, took place in the cold chill of an October day, with snowflakes in the air and with the broad expanse of marsh land almost deserted. As Gustav saw his brother fall prostrate in the boat, he lashed the two skiffs together and made for the shore as speedily as possible. Difficulties with phone connections and the distance of the place from the main traveled roads somewhat hindered the hurried preparations which were made to call the Senator's relatives and medical aid. B. A. Husting, accompanied by Dr. Twohig and M. K. Raidy left this city at 6 o'clock. A short time before Dr. Backhuber and B. J. Husting started by automobile from Mayville, leaving there at 5:40. Two physicians at Ripon were already on the way at that hour, these men being the first to reach the Blackburn residence.
          Drive to This City
     As the party left the Blackburn home for Fond du Lac, it was snowing quite hard. All had remained there to wait for the arrival of the truck that was to transport the body to Rosendale, which was the first station on the way to Fond du Lac. At 2 o'clock this morning the body was in the morgue. Throughout the day a reverent interest was displayed by Fond du Lac people, many calling at the undertaking parlors to make inquiries about the almost unbelievable accident. Dr. Backhuber and B. J. Husting drove home after reaching this city. Mr. Husting was expected to return this morning to accompany the body home.
          Elected to the Senate in 1914
     Senator Husting was elected to the United States Senate in 1914 to succeed Isaac Stephenson for the term of office ending March 3, 1921. Former Gov. Francis E. McGovern was his Republican opponent. The outcome was very close, Senator Husting winning by a narrow margin in one of the most spectacular political contests in the state's history.
     Soon after he went to Washington, the Senator became one of the administration leaders. He has been Wisconsin's heroic figure since the United States declared war against Germany. Throughout his brief career at the national capitol, he stood squarely back of President Wilson in all matters pertaining to a vigorous and successful prosecution of the war.
     He was Wisconsin's spokesman in the United States Senate on the side of America, and his stand won him many friends among Republicans and Democrats who did not support him when he ran for election.
     The Senator waged an uncompromising fight in his own state to check the work of German propagandists.
          Led in Fight for Firm Stand
     During the early days of his term, Congress was flooded with telegrams from all parts of the country, including Wisconsin, which, as Senator Husting brought out, were inspired by German sympathizers. When the foreign relations committee was all but panic stricken, and Congress seemed timid about asserting our rights on the high seas, he led the way for a firm stand on the part of this goverment. He exposed the real purpose of the telegrams that flooded Washington; he, with others, blocked the scheme to stampede Congress.
     Although a new in United States Senate he attracted nationwide attention, and was looked upon as one of President Wilson's staunchest and most reliable supporters. He gained in personal influence, and in the last session of Congress he was appointed to membership on some of the more important committees.
     As a member of the state senate in Wisconsin he was one of the real leaders of the Democratic party. He gained wide prominence by his fight for teh so-called Husting waterpower bill which is now a law. He was especially interested in legislation of a social welfare nature. Although not a striking orator, his style of speech in a public body was earnest and attractive. He was a good fighter, an uncomprimising fighter for the things he considered right. Although an active figure in politics at times when Wisconsin engaged in sharp factional strife, both within the Republican and Democratic parties, he had no bitter enemies.
          Born at Fond du Lac
     Senator Husting was born in Fond du Lac, April 25, 1866, and removed with his parents to Mayville in 1876. He attended the common schools of Fond du Lac and Dodge counties until his sixteenth year, when, owing to the limited means of his parents, he was forced temporarily to drop out of school. He became a clerk in a general store, and soon afterward received an appointment as a clerk in the post office. Then he obtained a position as a railway postal clerk, and later became a clerk in the office of secretary of state at Madison.
     Early in life he had an ambition to finish his education at the University of Wisconsin and this ambition was realized in 1895, when he enrolled as a student at the state university. In December of that year he passed the state bar examination and commenced the practice of law at Mayville, in which business he has been engaged in ever since.
     He was elected district attorney in 1902 and again in 1904. In 1906 he was elected state senator from the Thirteenth senatorial district, and reelected in 1910. He was one of the outstanding leaders of the Democratic party and was quick to gain widespread recognition as a thoughtful legislator and a good fighter.6

Paul Oscar Adolph Husting was buried at He was buried in Graceland Cemetery. on 24 October 1917 at Mayville, Wisconsin.2 Funeral services were held on 24 October 1917 at Mayville, Wisconsin.4

The following obituary was printed in the Fond du Lac Journal on 26 Oct 1917:
Husting Death Causes Shock
     An announcement of the tragic death of United States Senator Paul J. Husting of Mayville, Wis., who was shot in a hunting accident at Rush Lake, near Ripon, last Sunday afternoon, caused great sorrow among the Fort Atkinson friends of the noted Wisconsin man Monday. Senator Husting was fatally injured when a charge of shot fired from a gun in the hands of his brother, Gustave, entered his back. Each had a boat. The senator was a short distance ahead of his brother when he sighted a flock of ducks, and called Gustave to shoot. As his brother fired the senator stood up in his boat and received the charge in his back.
     Almost prostrated by the tragedy, the brother managed to get the stricken man to shore and carried him to a nearby farm house. Physicians were summoned from Ripon, but the senator died before they arrived. His dying words were, "Tell them that I did the best I knew how."
     Senator Husting was born in Fond du Lac April 25, 1866. He removed with his parents to Mayville in 1876. He was admitted to the bar in 1895 and was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1914 for the term of 1915-21 at the first direct election of a U. S. Senator by the people of Wisconsin.
     Funeral services were held at Mayville Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. Many United States senators, representatives, state officials, and a large throng of plain citizens gathered at the grave to pay final respects.
     Mr. Husting was widely known as a man earnest and untiring in his efforts and the work which he has done in supporting the administration in the present crisis has been both partiotic and brilliant.7

As of before 1926, Paul Oscar Adolph Husting was also known as Paul Oscar Adolph Husting Alternate name as given in the Rock River Valley: Its History, Traditions, Legends and Charms.8

HON. PAUL OSCAR ADOLPH HUSTING
     
     The report of the proceedings in the senate of the Unted States, marking the memorial service in behalf of the late Paul Oscar Adolph Husting, United States senator from the state of Wisconsin, March 2, 1919, carries the addresses delivered on that occasion by his colleague, the late Hon. Robert M. La Follette of Wisconsin and other representative members of that distinguished body. Senator la Follette on that solemn occasion, after stating that Paul O. Husting was born in the city of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, April 25, 1866, and that his father, John P. Husting, a native of the grand duchy of Luxemburg, had emigrated to the to the United States in 1855, said: :It has been my privilege to know the father of my late colleague and friend, Senator Husting. He was a man of rare character and exceptional refinement, a skilled watchmaker, who brought with him from his fatherland a love of music and art and a ready command of several languages. The mother of Senator husting is a woman of that native power and marked individuality so typical of our strong pioneer stock. She is the daughter of Solomon Juneau, who in 1818 founded the city of Milwaukee. A foolish pride in ancestry is a weakness. A just pride in ancestry may inspire a worthy ambition in one to render a high service to his generation and to posterity. I venture to dwell for a moment upon this branch of the ancestry of the late Senator Husting.
     Solomon Juneau was the first white man who located on the present site of Milwaukee, where as the representative of the American Fur Company he established a trading post. He built there, in 1822m the first log house, and two years later the first frame house erected in Milwaukee. He died in 1856. He was at one time a man of great wealth and owned a large portion of the land on which finally was built the metropolis of Wisconsin. Solomon Juneau was of pure french or Alsatian ancestry, and was an honest, upright, forceful man, the trusted friend and counselor of the great body of Indians then living in the territory of Wisconsin. The author of 'The Pioneer History of Milwaukee' says of Juneau: 'He was, without exception, the finest looking specimen of his race I have ever seen. In height over six feet, large of frame and straight as an arrow.'
     "On an eminence in Juneau park, overlooking the city of Milwaukee and facing the sun as it rises over Lake Michigan, stands the commanding bronze statue of Solomon Juneau, the grandfather of Senator Husting. The wife of Solomon Juneau, the grandmother of our deceased colleague, was of French and Indian blood. She was the grandniece of La Farrinee, the old Menomonie king. She was a woman of striking presence and high courage. On more than one occasion it is recorded that she saved the lives of the first settlers of that section, who would otherwise have fallen victims to Indian vengeance. From his ancestry upon both sides Senator Paul O. Husting inherited a fine nature , sterling integrity of character and a rugged, intrepid courage that would make no compromise with defeat." Enlarging on this detail, Mr. Husting's devotion to his convictions, Senator la Follette pointed out that "the election of Senator Husting (in 1914) to the United States senate from a strong republican state testifies to the respect and the trust which the people of that commonwealthreposed in the man. He had served but eight years in the state senate, but that brief period had sufficed to make him known everywhere as a man of sterling integrity, a close student of public affairs, an able debater and a conscientious legislator, keenly alert and active at all times in the public interest. As a member of the United States senate, as in the legislature of his native state, he impressed his colleagues with his industry, his courage, his devotion to his convictions at any cost or sacrifice."
     in his comments on the tragic death of Senator Husting, which proved a great shock to the senate and to the country, Senator La Folley set out that "when the congress adjourned, October 6, 1917, he went directly to his home in Wisconsin to find recreation in the one form which had appealed to him most strongly from boyhood. The call of the wild was in his blood. It was a part of his inheritance. He loved the forests, the streams, the thousand lakes of his native state. He was an expert woodsman, a trained hunter. Whenever fred from his professional duties and the work imposed upon him by public life he always sought recreation in the wilds of northern Wisconsin. And so on this occasion, after a brief visit with his aged parents and the other loved ones of his family, with guns and dogs and boat, he sought his heart's desire on one of his favorite hunting excursions. He was accompanied by a younger brother whom Paul had trained to the skillful use of the gun. Then, without warning, the end came. It fell to his fate (October 21, 1917) to go down under an accidental shot fired by his brother!"
     "What a tragic suggestion that brings to us," said Senator James Hamilton Lewis of Illinois in his memorial address on this occasion. "We are inclined to feel such to be a great and indescribable catastrophe, and yet I wonder if we cannot indulge this thought: That nature has her way of paying her debt to her children and of attracting attention to the event that shows the tribute paid. When you have seen the sunlight upon a mountain peak your eyes are drawn to it in the glow and glory of all its beauty and we break into the rapture of praise; but when the evening comes and the solemn shades befall it, we seldom turn to note it again. It is wrapped in gloom. It is dark and lost to view. Sir, the sun and radiance of the highest touch of his career fell upon him, and just as it glowed upon him with a radiance that a star lights a promontory he was stricken, and from this high moment passed on, but left to his people the reflection of all that he meant to them - a life of light that leads and duty performed that ennobled."
     In further tribute to the memory of his departed colleague Senator Lewis observed that "it fell to me after the death of Senator Husting to be in Wisconsin upon an errand that justified my going from county to county throughout that state. I heard the comments of those who had known him from his boyhood. I listened to the praise that fell to him for his career in the state legislature. I heard them speak tenderly of his poverty and yet, as against it all, how he resisted any opportunity that could have enriched him and would have aided some personal fortune to him. Despite all its temptations, he preferred his way - a rocky path, but in the light; and then I knew why it was that confidence was so reposed in him that everywhere one went he met the single verdict: 'He was an honest official, a true friend, a worth citizen of his state.' I was proud, sor, to hear that regard of those who were close to him." Along the same line, Senator Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas asked the question, "Will not all who knew Mr. husting intimately agree that earnestness was the keynote to his character and labors. As a senator he went about the public business with a realization of the importance of his duties and responsibilities. Yet he was prompted by no exaggerated conception of his own capacity or obligations. He constantly kept in mind the gravity and dignity of his position. This characteristic made him a great legislator.
     Senator Husting never compromised. He fought every legislative battle to a finish, enjoyed victory with moderation and endured defeat with resignation. An analysis of the legislative history of the United States will demonstrate the overwhelming importance, the real greatness of this attribute of character so generally, if not universally, demonstrated in the public services of Mr. Husting."
     Other similar eulogies on the life and services of the departed senator were made in this memorial session of the senate, among those so speaking being Mr. Walsh of Montana, Mr. Ashurst of Arizona, Mr. Gronna of South Dakota, Mr. Thomas of Colorado and Mr. Lenroot of Wisconsin. In his comment concerning Mr. Husting's unflinching integrity of purpose Mr. Walsh that "he never permitted his judgement upon any measure to be influenced by considerations of personal friendship for tis supporters, and he never yielded to importunities, however strong they might be, that did not wholly convince him of the error of his position.
     By common consent his speech in support of the resolution in favor of a declaration of war on the kaiser's government was the greatedt delivered on that momentous occasion. It was a ringing appeal to all citizens to be Americans and Americans only, and contributed much, no doubt, to the remarkable unanimity of sentiment with which the historic contest was prosecuted by the great republic of the western world."
     Similar tributes were paid in the house of representatives, Mr. Voigt, Mr. Esch and Mr. Browne of Wisconsin there voicing the common grief of the people of their state over the apssing of this valued public servant. The funeral of Senator Husting was conducted from his home place at Mayville, Dodge county, October 24, 1917. The eulogy on that ovccasion was delivered by his friend of many years' standing, Judge martin L. Lueck, who in closing touchingly observed that "it can truthfully be said of Senator Husting that his home life, as well as his private career and public activities, was ideal. He died with the words on his lips that characterized his whole existence: 'I did the best I knew how.' A good and useful life actuated by noble purpose. No man can do better." To Senator Husting's aged mother President Wilson sent a message declaring that "your son's death has come to me as a great personal grief. He was one of the most conscientious public servants I have ever known and had entered upona career of usefulness to his state and to the country which was of the highest promise. I grieve with you with all my heart."8

Citations

  1. [S196] Labor and Industrial Statistics, Wisconsin Blue Book.
  2. [S159] Biographies, 1919.
  3. [S161] Husting History.
  4. [S157] Hartford Times Press, 1 Dec 1916.
  5. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.
  6. [S107] The Daily Commonwealth, 22 Oct 1917.
  7. [S130] Fond du Lac Journal, 26 Oct 1917.
  8. [S187] Unknown author.

Peter Husting

M
Reference=0027.7.5.3.2
     He is the son of Charles Husting and Jane Marden.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Peter Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.1.3.1
     He is the son of John Husting and Kate Gitzen.1

Peter Husting married Doris Bowker.1

Child of Peter Husting and Doris Bowker

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Peter M. Husting1

M, b. 1880, d. 12 September 1972
Reference=0027.2.6.5
     Peter M. Husting married Elizabeth Kiemen at St. Boniface church, Hastings, Dakota County, Minnesota.2 He was born in 1880.1 He was the son of Peter Mathew Husting and Barbara H. Kiefer.1

Peter M. Husting witnessed the marriage of Jacob Sontag and Anna B. Husting on 15 February 1905 at Guardian Angel's church.3

Peter M. Husting married Katherine Weber on 26 September 1927 at St. Boniface church, Hastings, MInnesota.4

Peter M. Husting died on 12 September 1972; The following death announcement appeared in the Hastings Gazette:
     HUSTING-Peter M., age 92, of 302 W. 8th St., Hastings. Survived by wife, Catherine, 1 son, Paul of Mpls., 1 brother, Lebo of Hastings, 2 sisters, Mrs. Anna Sontag of Hastings, Mrs. Theresa O'Shaugnessy of St. Paul, also 2 grandchildren & many neices and nephews. Funeral mass Minday 10 a.m. St. Boniface Catholic Church, Hastings. Int. St. Boniface Cemetery. Friends may call after 3 p.m. Sunday at the CATURIA FUNERAL HOME, 201 E. 7th St. Hastings. Parish vigil 7:30 p.m. Sunday.5

Child of Peter M. Husting and Elizabeth Kiemen

Citations

  1. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 2 Feb 1918.
  2. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 15 Sep 1912.
  3. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 16 Feb 1905.
  4. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 7 Oct 1927.
  5. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 12 Sep 1972.
  6. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Peter Mathew Husting1

M, b. 28 July 1846, d. 30 January 1918
Reference=0027.2.6
     He was born on 28 July 1846 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1 He was the son of Theodore Husting and Susanne Engel.1

Peter Mathew Husting married Barbara H. Kiefer, daughter of Katherine Weber, on 15 February 1871 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin. The marriage was witnessed by Theodore Husting and John Langenbach.1,2

Peter Mathew Husting died on 30 January 1918 at cause: pneumonia at age 71; The Hastings Gazette lists the death date as 31 Jan 1918.1,3

The following obituary appeared in the Hastings Gazette on 2 February, 1918:
     Mr. Peter Husting died at his home, Sixth Street, on Thursday, of pneumonia, after an illness of only a few days. He was born in Luxemborg, Germany, in 1845, coming to this country with his parents when six years old. Moving to this county from Wisconsin about forty years ago, he located on a farm in Ravenna, where he remained until two years ago, when he retired and came to this city. Besides his wife he leaves six sons and oour daughters. Georgem of Buffalo, N.Y., L.P. and P.M. of Hastings, J.E. of Strandquist, Minn., L.F. of Miesville, and E.M. of Camp Cody, N.M., Mrs. Michael O'Shaugnessy of Welch, Mrs. Jacob Sontag of Hastings, Mrs. Henry Klein of Milwaukee, and Mrs. Simon Mainz of Miesville, and twenty grandchildren. The funeral will be held from St. Boniface Church on Monday, at ten a.m., the Rev. Werner Schnennenheim officiating. Interment at the church cemetery.3

Children of Peter Mathew Husting and Barbara H. Kiefer

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  3. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 2 Feb 1918.
  4. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.
  5. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 3 Nov 1932.
  6. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 6 May 1965.
  7. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 1 Dec 1900.
  8. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 19 Mar 1959.

Polly Husting

F
Reference=0027.7.5.3.3
     She is the daughter of Charles Husting and Jane Marden.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Richard Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.6.A.6
     He is the son of Edward M. Husting and Gertrude O'Shaughnessy.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Robert Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.6.A.2
     He is the son of Edward M. Husting and Gertrude O'Shaughnessy.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Simpson Husting1

M, b. 1856
Reference=0027.2.8
     He was born in 1856 at Theresa, Wisconsin.1 He was the son of Theodore Husting and Susanne Engel.1

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.

Steve Husting

M
Reference=0027.7.5.4.1
     He is the son of N.B. (Juneau) Husting and Anne Steidinger.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Steven Husting1

M
Reference=27.2.6.6
     He is the son of John Husting and Madeline Stephen.1 He lived on 19 March 1959 in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.1

Citations

  1. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 3-19-1959.

Susan Husting1

F
     She is the daughter of Charles Husting.1

Citations

  1. [S176] Unknown Newspaper, 27 Jan 1888.

Susanne Husting

F, b. 2 July 1841, d. 16 February 1931
Reference=0027.8
      Susanne Husting was also known as Kramer.

She was born on 2 July 1841 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.1,2 She was the daughter of Michael Husting and Anna Maria (Binsfeld) Cloos. She immigrated on 28 April 1855 to From Le Havre, France, New York, New York; She sailed on the John Hancock with her family.3 She witnessed the baptism of Susanna Bertha Langenbach on 14 February 1858 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin; Her Baptismal Sponsors were Michael Engel and Susanna Husting.4 She witnessed the baptism of Johann Langenbach on 1 May 1861 at Theresa, Wisconsin; His other Baptismal Sponsor was Wilhelm Haubach.4

Susanne Husting married James Kraemer on 18 September 1862 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin. The marriage was witnessed by Charles Lanners and Nicholas Husting.4 She witnessed the baptism of Johann Arthur Kraemer on 23 May 1865 at St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Wisconsin.4 She witnessed the baptism of Susana Laura Ruedebusch on 10 September 1891 at St. Mary's Church, Mayville, Dodge County, Wisconsin.5 She witnessed the baptism of Roman Otto Weber on 13 August 1893 at St. Mary's Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.6

Susanne Husting died on 16 February 1931 at age 89.1,2

Susanne Husting was buried at Calvary Cemetary, Section 3, Row 5 after 16 February 1931 at Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin.1

Children of Susanne Husting and James Kraemer

Citations

  1. [S49] Inscriptions of Calvary Cemetary, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, pp. 36a.
  2. [S161] Husting History.
  3. [S324] John Hancock, 28 Apr 1855.
  4. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  5. [S413] Church Records, FHL #1863207, Items 5 & 6, St. Mary's Records.
  6. [S119] Church Record, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 1866-1920.
  7. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Suzanne Husting

F, b. 1904, d. 1977
Reference=0027.7.8.3
     She was born in 1904.1 She was the daughter of Berthold (Pete) Juneau Husting and Agnes Sternberger.2

Suzanne Husting married Ralph B. Wackman on 21 August 1926 at Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.2,3

The following announcement appeared in the Mayville News on 25 Aug 1926:
     Miss Suzanne Husting of this city was married Saturday to Ralph B. Wackman of Madison. The ceremony took place at Milwaukee at high noon, Judge John C. Karel, Milwaukee, performing the ceremony.
     The bride wore a gown of blue moire and a blue hat and carried a bouquet of pink roses. Miss Adele Martens, Mayville, bridesmaid, wore beige satin with a beige hat and carried an arm bouquet of snapdragons and delphiniums. Harold Daniels was the bridesgroom's attendant.
     The bride is the eldest daughter of Atty. and Mrs. B. J. Husting. She is a graduate of the Mayville High School and a graduate of the University of the class of '26. She also spent two years at Ripon college.
     The groom is also a graduate of University of Wisconsin of the class of '24. After a wedding dinner at the Elk's Club at Milwaukee, at which imediate relatives and a few friends were present, the young couple left on a wedding journey. After their return Mr. and Mrs. Wackman will reside at Milwaukee, where Mr. Wackman will join the staff of the Milwaukee Sentinel.3

Suzanne Husting died in 1977.1

Children of Suzanne Husting and Ralph B. Wackman

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.
  3. [S217] Mayville, 25 Aug 1926.

Suzanne Husting1

F
Reference=0027.3.2.2.2
     She is the daughter of Paul John Hilary Husting and Margaret Kostanzer.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Theodor Husting1

M, b. 10 June 1778, d. after 1794
Reference=0054.4
     Theodor Husting was baptized on 10 June 1778 at Fischbach, Mersch, Luxembourg.2 He was born on 10 June 1778.1 He was the son of Johan Joseph Husting and Elisabeth Binsfeld.1

Theodor Husting died after 1794.1

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.
  2. [S276] IGI Index, 22 Mar 1999.

Theodore Husting

M, b. 21 February 1817, d. 21 April 1886
Reference=0027.2
      He brewer at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.1,2 He was born on 6 October 1816 at Switzerland.1 He was born on 21 February 1817 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.3,4 He was the son of Michael Husting and Barbara Becker.

Theodore Husting married Susanne Engel on 7 May 1840 at Lintgen, Mersch, Luxembourg.3 He immigrated on 30 September 1854 to New York City, New York; Theodore and family arrived in New York City 30 Sep 1854 from Antwerp, Belgium on board the ship "George Hurlbert".3

Susanne Engel witnessed the baptism of Susanna Mathilda Ory on 12 March 1857 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.5 He was New Tag on 10 November 1862 at Witnessed the baptism of Gertrude Crudwig, Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.5 He witnessed the baptism of Jacob Langenbach on 7 May 1863 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States; Sponsors: Theodor Husting and Jacobi Craemer.5 He was New Tag on 12 March 1869 at Witnessed the baptism of Theodor Otto Becker, Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.5 He was New Tag on 15 February 1871 at Witnessed the marriage of Martin Kiefer and Rosa Strupp, Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States.5

Theodore Husting witnessed the marriage of Barbara H. Kiefer and Peter Mathew Husting on 15 February 1871 at Theresa, Dodge County, Wisconsin.3,5 He lived in 1880 in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; Catherine Husting was living with her parents in 1880.2

Theodore Husting was buried at St. Matthews Cemetery in April 1886 at Campbellsport, Fond du Lac, WI; New Cassel was formerly Auburn Township, and now is Campbellsport.3

Theodore Husting died on 21 April 1886 at According to Christopher Miasnik, he died at New Cassel, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin., Campbellsport, Wisconsin, at age 69.3

Children of Theodore Husting and Susanne Engel

Citations

  1. [S326] Tracy Reinhardt, "Tracy Reinhardt email," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 27 Oct 1997, taken from Swiss cemetery records.
  2. [S347] 1880 Census, Theodor Husting household.
  3. [S161] Husting History.
  4. [S276] IGI Index, 22 Mar 1999.
  5. [S51] St. Theresa Catholic Church, Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States.
  6. [S326] Tracy Reinhardt, "Tracy Reinhardt email," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 27 Oct 1997.

Theodore Husting1

M
Reference=0027.2.5.5.1
     He is the son of William Husting and Julia Strawhand.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Theodorus Usquin Husting1

M, b. 17 December 1807
Reference=0054.2.2
     He was born on 17 December 1807.1 He was the son of Antoine Nicholas Husting and Anna Prommenschenkel.1

Citations

  1. [S161] Husting History.