Christian Rößler

M, b. 10 January 1788, d. 4 September 1861
Reference=0050.3
     He was born on 10 January 1788 at Wurtemburg, Germany.1 He was the son of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.2,3,4 He was born on 10 October 1788 at Schützingen, Maulbronn, Württemberg.2,3

Christian Rößler was also known as Roessler.

Christian Rößler was confirmed in 1802 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was his first communion or his confirmation.3

Christian Rößler was a wagon maker after 1817 at Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio.5

Christian Rößler married Tortea Elizabeth Miller, daughter of Johann Mueller and Hanna Stratman, on 14 September 1819 at Lancaster, Ohio.5,1 He immigrated after 1825 to America after 1825, the application date.2,6,7

Christian Rößler lived in 1849 in Rose Township, Shelby County, Illinois.5

Christian Rößler died on 4 September 1861 at Shelby County, Illinois, at age 73.5,1

Christian Rößler was buried at St. Paul's cemetery, and was moved to Glenwood cemetery in 1914. at Shelbyville, Illinois.5,1

     Christian Roessler was born in Wurtemburg, Germany and came to America in 1815, locating at Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. He learned the trade of a wagon-maker in the Old country and pursued that business at different places in Europe. A skilled and competent workman, he earned an excellent reputation for thoroughness and efficiency. Upon coming to Lancaster, Ohio, he engaged in business for himself, and his work was noted far and wide for its excellence and completeness. He continued thus employed in Lancaster until 1832, when he sold out and purchased a farm in Fairfield County, where he turned his attention to farming and made it his home until 1849.
     During the year just mentioned Christian Roessler sold his farm in Ohio and emigrated to Illinois, settling in what is now Rose Township, Shelby County. There he continued to live until his demise, which occurred in September, 1861. His marriage in Lancaster united him with Elizabeth Miller, who was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, in the year 1799. She lived until July, 1871, when she passed away in Rose Township. Both Christian Roessler and his wife were earnest in their religious life as members of the Lutheran Church. He ever took an active part in local affairs and was efficient in helping to build the old Indianapolis & St. Louis Railroad when it passed through Shelby County, and was a stockholder in that company. He had a family of four sons and two daughters - Reuben, Edward; Regina, who is the wife of B. Christman; Andrew; Philip, and Elizabeth, who is the wife of Charles Pfeiffer.8

Children of Christian Rößler and Tortea Elizabeth Miller

Citations

  1. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 5.
  2. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  3. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  4. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.
  5. [S117] Becca Davidson, "Becca Davidson Email Correspondence," e-mail to Dana Kellerman.
  6. [S38] , pp. 190. As of publication, he is listed as 'citizen in America'., Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  7. [S113] Index to Wuerttem berg Emigration, Wuerttemberg Emigration Index.
  8. [S334] Pg. 205-206, in Portrait and Biographical Record of Shelby County, Illinois.
  9. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 7.
  10. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 30.
  11. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 113.
  12. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 114.
  13. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 149.
  14. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 156.
  15. [S333] Katherine Borchers Cotner, compiler, Descendents of Christian Roessler, Page 181.

Christina Barbara Rößler

F, b. 16 December 1807
Reference=0050.7
     She was born on 16 December 1807 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2,3 She was the daughter of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.1,2,4

Christina Barbara Rößler was confirmed in 1821 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was her confirmation or her first communion.2

Christina Barbara Rößler immigrated in 1834 or 1835 to North America.1,2

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  2. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S113] Index to Wuerttem berg Emigration, Wuerttemberg Emigration Index, Ancestry.com.
  4. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.

Georg Michael Rößler1

M, b. 2 October 1796, d. 21 February 1868
Reference=0050.0
     He was born on 2 October 1796 at alternate birth date listed as 8 Oct 1796, Schützingen, Maulbronn, Württemberg.2,3,4 He was the son of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.2,5,6

Georg Michael Rößler was also known as Roessler.

Georg Michael Rößler was also known as Ressler.7 He was confirmed in 1810 at Confirmation or First Communion, Schützingen, Württemberg.5

Georg Michael Rößler married Anna Maria Strasser, daughter of Johann Friedrich Strasser and Regina Catharina Aschinger, on 24 September 1823 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,8,9

Georg Michael Rößler was a cartwright/wheelwright, citizen and soldier at Schützingen, Württemberg.10,8,11

[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN]
Schutzingen, Jan. 16, 1831
Greetings and God's blessings:
     We would be very happy if this letter reaches you in good health. We would like to let you know about how things are here. Our father has been ill for five weeks. We had to change his position in bed often, and he is paralyzed on one side. We have nothing but worries with him. Besides that we are healthy, thank God. We received your letter on January 7, 1831. We had to pay one Heller and 50 Groschen for it. How things are here we do not need to tell you, because you know that things have not improved and everything is getting worse. If you have a good place to stay, maybe you could help us out, in case we would come to you, until be recuperated. Let us know if it would be good for us to come or not. You know, it would not have to be right away, maybe in two or three years. By then you also will know better how things are in America.
     Michael Rossler hopes to go to America this spring, if he can travel through France. He has already sold all his possessions. Martin Reiter has not written yet, but if I hear from him, I will write to his father and let him know where you are, so that you could see each other. He has not written to anybody, not even to Graf, that he is in New York. Klaus from Ochsenbach has also not written. But after receiving your letter I let the people in Ochsenbach know that we had heard from you. Hollwart has not left yet, but we know that Heinrich Gink is in Philadelphia. Heinrich Rossler went to visit Philadelphia and went to see Gink. Rossler had to give Gink five dollars, because they had no money left to buy food. Everybody was seasick and his son apparently died. The old Mains does not come to America anymore, he killed himself by drowning on Whit Sunday. Johannes Wiegand is dead, too. He was not ill when he went to see his brother, but had a sudden hemorrhage.
     I will leave for America on April 1st. If you would like to go further inland, you could join me when I go to my brothers, Michael Rossler and Jakob Friedrich Rossler, in Millersburg, Bergs County, Penn., North America, Pethel Post Office. It is approximately 10-12 hours from your place.
     Kindest regards from Johann Kehrwecker and Wilhelm Kull. Also greetings from the widow of Conrad and her daughter, and from the daughter of Michael Conrad, Gottliebe, and from your comrades. Your guardian, Johann Rossler wishes you all the happiness. I do not need to tell you how to be happy, you will know that yourself.
     I would like you know if you have delivered my letter to my brother yet. It is important for me, because my brother Michael is coming to America soon.
     Right now your father is very ill and I am afraid he will not live very long anymore.
     Schutzingen, February 5, 1831
     Johann Rossler
Beadle.12
He emigrated after 16 January 1831 from Emigrated with wife and children to North America.1,8,12,9

[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN]
Schutzingen, April 1, 1833
     Since we have the possibility through Martin Bauer, we would like to write to you a little bit about our affairs. What our health concerns, we are all well, thank God. There was a scarlet fever epidemic and many children died, but ours are well again. We cannot tell you anything about our brother-in-law, Wilhelm Kull, since we have not heard from him yet. We are waiting daily to get some news. You suggest that he should have come to America. That would have been too expensive for him, and there would not have been any money left for him to start with. We were told so often that it is not good for a family to come without money to America. They decided instead to go to Russia, since one can have land there for free. Maybe they stayed in Poland, since a lot of farms have been abandoned, and the Russian government wants to sell them. Andreas Karl Kummer is also off to Poland and the shepherd Hiller went with him. But Hiller came back again in rags and with lice. You know that Hiller is no good, and Kummer only persuaded him to come along because he had some money. When that was gone, the stupid Hiller had to go and the provisions are cheap. But in fall we had bad weather with hailstorms, and in the fall of last year we had a cold spell, where a lot of grapes got frost.
     We hope that this letter will reach you in good health. Be true to your master and work hard and everything will be fine. Don't forget what you learned in school. With God's will we will meet again. We give you the best greetings from all the friends and also from your guardian. As soon as we know something about Kull we will write to you.

Your guardian, Johann Rossler,[:CR]Johannes Kehrwecker
Christina Barbara,
Philipp Hellman,
Sabine Katharina.
Mulhauser and Paul Reuter, both single, and Karolina Sautter left in spring 1832 for America. There has been no news from them. One says they are dead. Martin Reuter is supposed to be in Canada.12
He Purchased Land Listed as George Ressler. He purchased 40 acres. No price was given on the deed of purchase. on 10 September 1834 at Chillicothe, Ohio, United States.13 He appeared on the census of 1850.14

As of 1850, Georg Michael Rößler was also known as Michael Risler.15

Georg Michael Rößler was a farmer.16

[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN]
Schutzingen, April 10, 1859
Dear brother and sister-in-law,
I would like to give you my kindest regards. This could be the last time that you hear from me, since my health is failing. Johann wrote me that you have many children. Best wishes to them and God's blessing.
My daughter Friedrike is getting married to Christof Burer this spring, and my oldest son is married, too. Dear brother, our nephews, who will be coming to you, same to see me. I am very sad to see them go, but maybe they will have a happier life in America.
I do not know what else to write to you. My sincere regards to you, dear brother, to your wife, and the children. Say hello to Johann Kehrwecker and to his wife. May God be with them.
Dear brother, I will send you a little present to remember me.
I and my children send you the best regards, and we wish you happiness and God's blessing.
In my own handwriting, greetings from your sincere friend,
Christof Burer
[verso] Letter to Georg Kehrwecker.
Received on June 2nd, 1859.12


He appeared on the census of 1860.17

[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN]
Schutzingen, March 26, 1861
Dearest friends,
With great longing I am waiting for a letter from you. After receiving this letter, please, answer promptly. But should you have written to us to Germany in the meantime, there is no need to write again until Johann and Johannes have their money. The money is there, but the court has not taken care of the bill yet. It should be taken care of soon, and then they will get their money. In Christian's case it is the same, a lot of petty details have to be taken care of. In my next letter I will send you Christian's bill.
I also would like you to know how I was received in Reutlingen, where I was visiting Georg Renz's sister-in-law. They took me in with great happiness and wanted to know everything about their sister and brother-in-law. I was invited to eat and drink with them quite often and had to answer many questions. They also wanted to know what you will be doing with that much land and that you had demanded to get the estate of your deceased sister. Barbara Hack told me she would not be writing to Georg Renz for 14 months, because he has not answered her letter for that long and she does not know if he has received the money or not. She had asked me in a letter from March 19th if I would be going to America this year or not. I explained my circumstance and wrote her that I would not be leaving this year. When I went to see them they gave me two pairs of stockings and two hats for the children. Mrs. Renz saw the envelope again which she had left behind for her sisters. They gave me also a nice notebook for Friedrich Renz, which I will send back to Reutlingen, since I am not going to America this year.
I delivered the portraits which I took along to Germany and I also showed them around, as you told me. The people in Reutlingen would have loved to keep them all, but I told them that I had to deliver them. Barbara Hack said she wished Friedrich Renz had come with me. An when they saw Georg Renz's wife they asked if all women were so beautiful in America. I told them, not all of them. They gave me a Prussian dollar for my travels, and in case that this should not be sufficient, their brother-in-law should give me the difference when I am back in America. I delivered all the things as I was told.
It took five days to travel across Baden. First I went to Enzberg, then to Eutigen, Pforzheim, and to Dietlingen. I also went to Dietenhausen to see the father of shoemaker, M. Kais, who had worked with shoemaker Jakob in Westfield, who you should know.
I went to have a glass of wine in the inn "Zum Adler" and inquired about the old Michael Kais. The innkeeper went to get him immediately and I gave him the things his son had given me for him. He started to cry. After that we had supper together. Next morning I left for Konigsbach to see Kurt's brother. There were a lot of friends and it was like a wedding. They took me to Eisingen with two horses, where I stayed overnight. Dear cousins, I send you some cabbage seed from the Filder.
Kindest regards to all of you,
Philipp Gottlieb Kehrwecker
Also best greetings from my mother, who has not left bed yet.12




Georg Michael Rößler died on 21 February 1868 at He died of apoplexy, Miami Township, Ohio, at age 71.18,16

[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN]
Schutzingen, August 7, 1881
Dear cousins,
Since I wrote to you after my blessed mother's death, but have not heard from you in the meantime, I will take the liberty to write to you again about the conditions here. The past years were not very good. We had hardly any wine or fruit. Last year we lost most of our plum trees and other fruit trees due to heavy frost. This year is too dry and everything ripens prematurely. The wine should be fine if we have a nice fall, but we need some rain soon. These are the reasons why a lot of people are leaving for America. More than 40 people left this summer from Schutzingen along and many more would go if they had the money to do so.
Dear cousin, I have two sons who also would like to go to America, especially since their godfather, Gottlieb Kehrwecker, who had also been visiting with you in America, is encouraging them to do so.
Last year we had hardly any wine to sell, and we had also a very bad harvest. Thus, it would be very difficult for me to let both my sons go to America. My godfather urged me to write to you, dear cousin, and asked me not to stand in the way of my sons, especially since he regrets to have come back here and not to have left for America after his mother's death. I myself regret not to have emigrated while I was still single, especially since you had promised your help, dear cousin. For that reason I will let my two sons go to America, even though it will be very difficult for me. My oldest, Gottlieb, is 23 years old. The other, Christian, who just turned 18, is a blacksmith. I have also two daughters, Friederika, who is 25, and Christine, who is 16. My sister Friedrike has no children and my brother Wilhelm is not married. My brother Friedrich has five children. We are all well, thank God, and we hope that this letter reaches you in good health.
Best wishes from us to you,
Your cousins.
Dear cousin, my sons would like to leave for America this fall, and Gottlieb Kehrwecker, their godfather, has encouraged them to do so. I am not sure if I will have the money to pay for their trip, and I would prefer them to postpone their trip until next spring. I would be very grateful, dear cousin, for your advice. The photos which you sent my mother, are now hanging in our living room and we are looking at them very often.
I would like to end this letter now with the kindest regards to you from my wife, my children, and myself.
Your cousin,
Christoph Hellman.12




[TRANSLATED FROM GERMAN] [Nov. 1, 1881]
Dearest cousins,[:CR]     I received your letter on October 17th. My children, my sisters and brothers, and I were very happy to hear from you, especially since you wrote that everybody is healthy. I am especially glad that you will do me the favor to take in my sons. We are sure that you, dear cousin, will enjoy them very much. They will be very grateful to you. If my dear mother would still be alive she would be quite happy to know that my sons found a good home.
     After receiving your letter I made up my mind to send my sons to America, even though it will be hard to lose them, and to get the money together for the trip. But it was their ardent wish to go to America. They will travel to their new homeland from Rotterdam. The ship's name is "Amsterdam". The fare to New York is 188 Marks. If they will have the money to continue their trip is not sure. In any case, they will write to you from New York to let you know. They will leave Schutzingen on November 15th, and on November 19th they will board the ship.
     I will come to an end now. My sons can tell you everything after their arrival. Best greetings from all of us, my wife and the children, the brothers and sisters. Our regards to Mr. Kehrwecker.
Schutzingen, Nov. 1, 1881
Your cousin,
Christoph Hellman
[verso]

Dear friend and schoolmate,
     Since I have the opportunity to write something to you, I don't want to forego that chance. I have been thinking about you so many times, and I read your long letter and learned from it that you and your family are well, which made me very happy.
Greetings from your friend,

Christoph Burer and his wife Friederieke Burer.12

Children of Georg Michael Rößler and Anna Maria Strasser

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record #694.
  2. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 694, 690.
  3. [S38] , pp. 190, 274, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  4. [S113] Index to Wuerttem berg Emigration, Wuerttemberg Emigration Index, Ancestry.com, Vol 6.
  5. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  6. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.
  7. [S332] Lisa Hoffman, "Lisa Hoffman email," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 3 Dec 2001.
  8. [S38] , pp. 274, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  9. [S113] Index to Wuerttem berg Emigration, Wuerttemberg Emigration Index.
  10. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 694.
  11. [S37] Schützingen, Württemberg, Germany, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Taufen, 1801-1879; FHL Film #1184996.
  12. [S111] "CAC."
  13. [S214] "Bureau of Land Management Website", Ancestral File.
  14. [S88] 1850 Census record.
  15. [S110] Lisa Hoffman, "Hoffman correspondence," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 1850 Census.
  16. [S110] Lisa Hoffman, "Hoffman correspondence," e-mail to Dana Kellerman.
  17. [S95] 1860 Census record.
  18. [S64] GenForum Posting from Lisa Hoffman, online http://genforum.genealogy.com/ressler, Forum: Ressler Family Genealogy Forum
    Posted by Lisa Hoffman, email: e-mail address
    Subject: Michael Ressler, Mary Ann Strauser
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/ressler/messages/83.html
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/ressler/
  19. [S110] Lisa Hoffman, "Hoffman correspondence," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, 1860 Census.
  20. [S88] 1850 Census record, Miami Township, Montgomery County.

Jakob Rößler

M
Reference=0200.0
     He was a citizen and farmer at Mühlacker.1,2

Jakob Rößler married Barbara Bapp.3

Jakob Rößler died at Listed as deceased in under Andreas Rossler's family entry., Mühlacker.2

Child of Jakob Rößler and Barbara Bapp

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  2. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S38] , p. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  4. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.

Jakob Friedrich Rößler

M, b. 3 November 1793
Reference=0050.5
     He was born on 3 November 1793 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2 He was the son of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.1,2,3

Jakob Friedrich Rößler was confirmed in 1807 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was his confirmation or first communion.2 He emigrated after 1807 from Emigrated to America.1,4

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  2. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.
  4. [S38] , pp. 190. As of publication, he is listed as 'citizen in America'., Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.

Johann Adam Rößler

M, b. 6 February 1791, d. 29 March 1849
Reference=0050.4
     He was born on 6 February 1791 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2 He was the son of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.3,4,5

Johann Adam Rößler was a gemeindepfleger and wheelwright.6

Johann Adam Rößler was a citizen, cartwright/wheelwright, parish worker at Schützingen, Württemberg.7,8

Johann Adam Rößler was confirmed in 1805 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was his first communion or confirmation.9

Johann Adam Rößler married Elisabetha Hellmann, daughter of Johann Georg Hellmann and Anna Elisabetha Linkin, on 28 July 1818 at Schützingen, Württemberg.7,4

Johann Adam Rößler died on 29 March 1849 at Schützingen, Württemberg, at age 58.4

Children of Johann Adam Rößler and Elisabetha Hellmann

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 692, 690.
  2. [S38] , pp. 190, 278, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  4. [S38] , pp. 278, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  5. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.
  6. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 697.
  7. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 692.
  8. [S38] , pp. 128, 278, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  9. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  10. [S38] , pp. 278, 363, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  11. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 692, 697.

Johann Andreas Rößler

M, b. 3 October 1786
Reference=0050.2
     He was born on 3 October 1786 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2 He was the son of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.1,3

Johann Andreas Rößler was confirmed in 1800 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was his first communion or confirmation.2

Johann Andreas Rößler immigrated after 1800.1,4

The following letter was sent from Johann Rössler to s friend or relative in America.
     Greetings and God's blessings:
     We would be very happy if this letter reaches you in good health. We would like to let you know about how things are here. Our father has been ill for five weeks. We had to change his position in bed often, and he is paralyzed on one side. We have nothing but worries with him. Besides that we are healthy, thank God. We received your letter on January 7, 1831. We had to pay one Heller and 50 Groschen for it. How things are here we do not need to tell you, because you know that things have not improved and everything is getting worse. If you have a good place to stay, maybe you could help us out, in case we would come to you, until be recuperated. Let us know if it would be good for us to come or not. You know, it would not have to be right away, maybe in two or three years. By then you also will know better how things are in America.
     Michael Rossler hopes to go to America this spring, if he can travel through France. He has already sold all his possessions. Martin Reiter has not written yet, but if I hear from him, I will write to his father and let him know where you are, so that you could see each other. He has not written to anybody, not even to Graf, that he is in New York. Klaus from Ochsenbach has also not written. But after receiving your letter I let the people in Ochsenbach know that we had heard from you. Hollwart has not left yet, but we know that Heinrich Gink is in Philadelphia. Heinrich Rossler went to visit Philadelphia and went to see Gink. Rossler had to give Gink five dollars, because they had no money left to buy food. Everybody was seasick and his son apparently died. The old Mains does not come to America anymore, he killed himself by drowning on Whit Sunday. Johannes Wiegand is dead, too. He was not ill when he went to see his brother, but had a sudden hemorrhage.
     I will leave for America on April 1st. If you would like to go further inland, you could join me when I go to my brothers, Michael Rossler and Jakob Friedrich Rossler, in Millersburg, Bergs County, Penn., North America, Pethel Post Office. It is approximately 10-12 hours from your place.
     Kindest regards from Johann Kehrwecker and Wilhelm Kull. Also greetings from the widow of Conrad and her daughter, and from the daughter of Michael Conrad, Gottliebe, and from your comrades. Your guardian, Johann Rossler wishes you all the happiness. I do not need to tell you how to be happy, you will know that yourself.
     I would like you know if you have delivered my letter to my brother yet. It is important for me, because my brother Michael is coming to America soon.
     Right now your father is very ill and I am afraid he will not live very long anymore.
     Schutzingen, February 5, 1831
     Johann Rossler
     Beadle.5

The following letter was sent from Jössler to a friend or relative in America:
     Since we have the possibility through Martin Bauer, we would like to write to you a little bit about our affairs. What our health concerns, we are all well, thank God. There was a scarlet fever epidemic and many children died, but ours are well again. We cannot tell you anything about our brother-in-law, Wilhelm Kull, since we have not heard from him yet. We are waiting daily to get some news. You suggest that he should have come to America. That would have been too expensive for him, and there would not have been any money left for him to start with. We were told so often that it is not good for a family to come without money to America. They decided instead to go to Russia, since one can have land there for free. Maybe they stayed in Poland, since a lot of farms have been abandoned, and the Russian government wants to sell them. Andreas Karl Kummer is also off to Poland and the shepherd Hiller went with him. But Hiller came back again in rags and with lice. You know that Hiller is no good, and Kummer only persuaded him to come along because he had some money. When that was gone, the stupid Hiller had to go and the provisions are cheap. But in fall we had bad weather with hailstorms, and in the fall of last year we had a cold spell, where a lot of grapes got frost.
     We hope that this letter will reach you in good health. Be true to your master and work hard and everything will be fine. Don't forget what you learned in school. With God's will we will meet again. We give you the best greetings from all the friends and also from your guardian. As soon as we know something about Kull we will write to you.
     Your guardian, Johann Rossler,
     Johannes Kehrwecker,
     Christina Barbara,
     Philipp Hellman,
     Sabine Katharina.
     Mulhauser and Paul Reuter, both single, and Karolina Sautter left in spring 1832 for America. There has been no news from them. One says they are dead. Martin Reuter is supposed to be in Canada.5

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  2. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 690.
  4. [S38] , pp. 190. As of publication, he is listed as 'citizen in America'., Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  5. [S335] Letter, Johann Roessler to Family Member in America, 1831-1833.

Luise Rößler

F, b. 17 June 1826, d. 30 October 1910
Reference=0025.0
     She was born on 17 June 1826 at 7:00 a.m., Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2,3,4,5,6,7 She was the daughter of Georg Michael Rößler and Anna Maria Strasser.1,2

Luise Rößler was baptized on 25 June 1826 at Protestant by Pastor M. Schoell, Schützingen, Württemberg. Godparents were Friedrich and Regina Strasser and Christina Barbara Rösslerin.2,8

Luise Rößler was also known as Luise.8

Luise Rößler was also known as Ressler.

Luise Rößler was also known as Roessler.

Luise Rößler also went by the name of Louisa.9

Luise Rößler was also known as Louise.

Luise Rößler immigrated in 1831 to North America with parents and siblings.1,2,4,8

As of 1844, Luise Rößler was also known as Ludovica.10

Luise Rößler married Jean Denig, son of Antoine Denig and Anne Kran, on 9 June 1844 at Holy Trinity Catholic church, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. Witnesses: Francis Johannes Meyer and Magdalena Stenc. Marriage performed by Father Francis L. Huber.11,12,13

As of 9 June 1844, Luise Rößler was also known as Ludovica Resler As it appeard on church marriage record.10

As of 15 February 1846, Luise Rößler was also known as Ludovicae Röessler As it appeard on Rose's baptismal record.10

Luise Rößler witnessed the baptism of Alex George Dana on 28 February 1875.14

Luise Rößler died on 29 October 1910 at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, at age 84; The Chiello research lists the death dats as 19 Oct.3,7,15

Luise Rößler died on 30 October 1910 at St. Mary's death record, 7:15 am, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, at age 84.16,17,18

The following obituary appeared in The Daily Reporter on 31 October 1910:
Dana-Mrs. Luisa Dana, wife of John Dana, Sr., passed away at her residence, 355 North Main street, at 7:15 Sunday morning, aged 84 years and 4 months.
     Mrs. Dana was born at Schützingen, Wittenberg, Germany. She was married to John Dana in 1844 at Cincinatti, O., and came to Wisconsin in 1847, settling on the Macy farm in Empire. In 1856, Mr. and Mrs. Dana moved to North Main street, this city, where they have resided since that time. The deceased is survived by her aged husband and children, Mrs. Rosa Schneider, St. Paul; Mary L., New York city; Mrs. John Guepe, Miss Agnes E. Dana, George P. Dana, James T. Dana, and William H. Dana, of this city, and twenty-seven grandchildren and six great grandchildren. She was a devoted Christian mother, a good kind neighbor and one whose friends were numbered by her aquaintances.
     The funeral will be held Wednesday at 9 o'clock from the residence and at 9:30 o'clock from St. Mary's church, at which solemn high mass will be held. Interment will be at Calvary cemetery. Friends please omit flowers.17

Luise Rößler was buried at Calvary Cemetary, Section 3, Row 18 on 2 November 1910 at Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin.3,17,18,19

Children of Luise Rößler and Jean Denig

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 694.
  2. [S37] Schützingen, Württemberg, Germany, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Taufen, 1801-1879; FHL Film #1184996.
  3. [S49] Inscriptions of Calvary Cemetary, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, pp. 41a.
  4. [S113] Index to Wuerttem berg Emigration, Wuerttemberg Emigration Index.
  5. [S316] 1905 State census, Wisconsin, FHL Film #1020439-990.
  6. [S38] , p. 274, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  7. [S329] Andy Chiello, "Andy Chiello research," e-mail to Dana Kellerman.
  8. [S38] , pp. 274, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  9. [S44] Hamilton County, Ohio, Civil Records.
  10. [S43] Denig Marriage & Births, Archdiocese of Cincinnati.
  11. [S43] Denig Marriage & Births, Holy Trinity church was located on W. 5th Street and Barr St. This was a German parish organized in 1834 and closed in 1958. It was the first German parish and the second Ctholic parish ion Cincinnati., Archdiocese of Cincinnati.
  12. [S44] Hamilton County, Ohio, Civil Records.: Document No. A-13-87.
  13. [S39] "Jean Denig Pedigree", Chart based on photocopied records from the archives in Metz. Chart compiled by Alain Chapellier (genealogist, identity card N 129).
  14. [S119] Church Record, Baptisms, Film # 1862866, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 1866-1920.
  15. [S312] Wisconsin Death Certificate.
  16. [S129] Fond du Lac Reporter, 7 Feb 1911.
  17. [S129] Fond du Lac Reporter, 31 October 1910.
  18. [S119] Church Record, Deaths, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 1866-1920.
  19. [S84] Fond du Lac, headstone inscription, Archives of D.F. Kellerman, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Regina Margaretha Rößler

F, b. 10 July 1784, d. 1841
Reference=0050.1
     She was born on 10 July 1784 at Schützingen, Württemberg.1,2 She was the daughter of Andreas Rößler and Regina Margaretha Haller.1,3

Regina Margaretha Rößler was confirmed in 1798 at Schützingen, Württemberg; This was her first communion or confirmation.3

Regina Margaretha Rößler married Johann Jacob Aschinger, son of Johann Aschinger and Agnes Marie Gutjahr, on 22 February 1814 at Schützingen, Württemberg.4,5

Regina Margaretha Rößler died in 1841 at Schützingen, Württemberg.6

Regina Margaretha Rößler died on 7 January 1849 at Death date recored with a '?'., Schützingen, Württemberg, at age 64.3

Children of Regina Margaretha Rößler and Johann Jacob Aschinger

Citations

  1. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690, 48.
  2. [S38] , pp. 16A, 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  3. [S38] , pp. 190, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  4. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 48.
  5. [S38] , 16A, Evangelical Church, Schützingen, Familienbuch ab 1760-1904.
  6. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Record 690.
  7. [S36] CGRS Brigitte Burkett Baden - Württemberg Emigrants, Records 48.

Jane Sadowsky

F, b. 18 September 1951
Reference=0002.2.3*
     She was born on 18 September 1951.1

Jane Sadowsky married James Michael Kellerman, son of Edgar Joseph Kellerman and Marie Martha Volant.2

Children of Jane Sadowsky and James Michael Kellerman

Citations

  1. [S278] Letter, Leona Kellerman Chesemore to Dana Kellerman.
  2. [S50] Mary Lemminger, "Lemminger Family Record."

L. W. Safford

M
Reference=cD0033
     He married Mary Riley, daughter of Malachi Riley and Bessie Donnelly.

Franz Xavier Salcher1

M, b. 26 July 1824, d. 29 August 1910
Reference=cW0044
     He was born on 26 July 1824.1 He was the son of J.K. Salcher and Agatha Hunold.1

Franz Xavier Salcher married Kreszenz Rapp on 1 May 1876.1

Franz Xavier Salcher married Walburga Weber, daughter of Leonhard Weber and Magdalena Mayerhofer.1

Franz Xavier Salcher died on 29 August 1910 at age 86.1

Citations

  1. [S412] Catholic family book records, p. 266, Schwendi Familienregister 1762-1859.

J.K. Salcher1

M
Reference=cW0045
     He was a shoemaker.1

J.K. Salcher married Agatha Hunold.

Child of J.K. Salcher and Agatha Hunold

Citations

  1. [S412] Catholic family book records, p. 266, Schwendi Familienregister 1762-1859.

Mary Salvas1

F
     She married Joseph Gagliardi, son of Joseph Gagliardi and Kathryn Glavin, on 12 June 1988.1

Children of Mary Salvas and Joseph Gagliardi

Citations

  1. [S279] Joan Alfredson, Lauerman Family History.

(?) Salvog1

M
     He married Winifred Husting, daughter of Leborious Husting and Loretta Brennan.1

Citations

  1. [S176] Unknown Newspaper, 27 Jan 1888.

(first son of Heinrich) Sandfort

M, b. 15 April 1841
Reference=0033.4.4.1
     He was born on 15 April 1841.1 He was the son of Heinrich Sandfort and Maria Bitter.1

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 27 Jul 2001.

(second son of Heinrich) Sandfort

M, b. 20 May 1843
Reference=0033.4.4.2
     He was born on 20 May 1843.1 He was the son of Heinrich Sandfort and Maria Bitter.1

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 27 Jul 2001.

Agnes Franzisca Sandfort1

F, b. 20 December 1816
Reference=0033.3.6
     She was born on 20 December 1816 at Albersloh, Westphalia.1,2 She was the daughter of Heinrich Anton Sandfort and Franzisca Schwartz.1

Citations

  1. [S20] Church Record, Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1711-1831.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001.

Anna Elisabeth Sandfort1

F, b. 20 August 1743
Reference=0066.3
     She was born on 20 August 1743 at Ascheberg, Münster, Westphalia.1,2 She was the daughter of Johann Heinrich Christopher Sandfort and Anna Maria Kohues.1,3

Anna Elisabeth Sandfort was baptized on 20 August 1743 at Ascheberg. Sponsors: Adolphus Fontein; Elisabeth Heubrock.1,4,2

Citations

  1. [S24] Catholic Church, Ascheberg, Taufen, 1690-1755., Catholic Church Ascheberg (Kr. Ludinghausen).
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 26 Oct 2001.
  3. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research.
  4. [S358] Kirchenbuch St. Lambertus church, Ascheberg.

Atonia Sandfort

F, b. 12 February 1838
Reference=0033.4.3.1
     She was born on 12 February 1838 at Münster, Westphalia.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Sandfort and Sophia von Fricken.1

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.

Bernhard Sandfort1

M, b. 9 May 1837
Reference=0033.4.1.1
     He was born on 9 May 1837 at Albersloh, Münster, Westphalia.1,2

Bernhard Sandfort was a bäcker.1,2 He was the son of Florenz Sandfort and Clara Gertrud Gertzen.1,2

Citations

  1. [S21] Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1822-1874.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.

Bernhard Sandfort1

M, b. 6 September 1809, d. 1 November 1846
Reference=0033.4.2
     He was born on 6 September 1809 at Münster, Westphalia.2 He was the son of Maximilian Franz Alexander Sandfort and Gertrud Wiedemann.3

Bernhard Sandfort was also known as Conrad Bernard.

Bernhard Sandfort was a merchant.4,5

Bernhard Sandfort married Maria Anna Steinhoff in 1834 at Albersloh, Münster, Westphalia.4,2

Bernhard Sandfort died on 1 November 1846 at Albersloh, Münster, Westphalia, at age 37.4,5

Children of Bernhard Sandfort and Maria Anna Steinhoff

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001, 02 Jul 2001.
  3. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001.
  4. [S21] Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1822-1874.
  5. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.
  6. [S12] Telgte Taufen 1810-1845, Catholic Parish of St. Clemens, Telgte.

Bernhard Sandfort1

M, b. 21 February 1820
Reference=0033.3.8
     He was born on 21 February 1820 at Albersloh, Westphalia.1,2 He was the son of Heinrich Anton Sandfort and Franzisca Schwartz.1

Bernhard Sandfort was a bäcker.2

Citations

  1. [S20] Church Record, Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1711-1831.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001.

Bernhard Sandfort1

M, b. before 1813
     He was born before 1813.1 He witnessed the baptism of Bernhard Kellermann on 4 September 1813 at St. Clemens, Telgte; Additional Sponsor: Maria Elisabeth (Otteloh) Hölling.1,2,3

Citations

  1. [S12] Telgte Taufen 1810-1845, Catholic Parish of St. Clemens, Telgte.
  2. [S276] IGI Index: source call #:0801420, 22 Mar 1999.
  3. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research.

Clara Sandfort

F, b. 22 May 1839
Reference=0033.4.3.2
     She was born on 22 May 1839 at Münster, Westphalia.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Sandfort and Sophia von Fricken.1

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.

Clara Philippina Sandfort1

F, b. 21 March 1840
Reference=0033.4.2.3
     She was born on 21 March 1840 at Telgte, Westphalia, Prussia.1 She was the daughter of Bernhard Sandfort and Maria Anna Steinhoff.1

Clara Philippina Sandfort was baptized on 26 March 1840 at Telgte. The baptism was witnessed by Clara Gertrud Gertzen Additional Sponsor: Theodor Baumhowe.1

Citations

  1. [S12] Telgte Taufen 1810-1845, Catholic Parish of St. Clemens, Telgte.

Clemens August Sandfort1

M, b. 1767, d. 17 October 1807
Reference=cK0128
     He was born in 1767 at Wolbeck, Westphalia.1,2

Clemens August Sandfort married Elisabeth Antonetta Lipmann on 24 October 1797 at Münster, Westphalia.2

His first wife, Elisabeth Antonetta Lipmann, died on 09 Nov 1798 in Münster, Westphalia.

Clemens August Sandfort married Catharina Elisabeth Muth, daughter of Georg Muth, on 12 October 1799 at Münster, Westphalia.1,2

Clemens August Sandfort was a bäcker.2

Clemens August Sandfort died on 17 October 1807 at Münster, Westphalia.1,2

Child of Clemens August Sandfort and Elisabeth Antonetta Lipmann

Children of Clemens August Sandfort and Catharina Elisabeth Muth

Citations

  1. [S27] Bistumsarchiv, Münster, Catholic Church, Wolbeck, Heiraten, 1688-1803; FHL Film #0865936.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.
  3. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research.

Conrad Bernard Anton Sandfort

M, b. 20 October 1772, d. 25 December 1830
Reference=0033.1
     He was born on 20 October 1772 at Wolbeck, Westphalia.1,2 He was the son of Johann Wilhelm Sandfort and Anna Margaretha Grüter.1,3

Conrad Bernard Anton Sandfort was baptized circa 20 October 1772 at Wolbeck. The baptism was witnessed by Conradus Bernhardus Anton Grüter Additional Sponsor(s): Anna Maria Prengert, geb Lü....?4,5

Conrad Bernard Anton Sandfort was a bäcker.6

Conrad Bernard Anton Sandfort married Catharina Elisabeth Muth, daughter of Georg Muth, on 26 April 1808 at Albersloh, Münster, Westphalia.4,6

Conrad Bernard Anton Sandfort died on 25 December 1830 at Albersloh, Westphalia, at age 58.4,6

Citations

  1. [S26] Wolbeck Catholic Church, Catholic Parish of St. Nikolaus, Wolbeck (Kr. Munster).
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 20 Feb 2001, 23 Jun 2001.
  3. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research.
  4. [S20] Church Record, Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1711-1831.
  5. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 20 Feb 2001.
  6. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001.

Elisabeth Sandfort1

F, b. 11 March 1811
Reference=033.3.3
     She was born on 11 March 1811 at Albersloh, Westphalia.1,2 She was the daughter of Heinrich Anton Sandfort and Franzisca Schwartz.1

Citations

  1. [S20] Church Record, Catholic Church, Albersloh, Taufen/Heiraten/Tote, 1711-1831.
  2. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 23 Jun 2001.

Elisabeth Sandfort

F, b. 24 August 1802
Reference=cK0131
     She was born on 24 August 1802 at Münster, Westphalia.1 She was the daughter of Clemens August Sandfort and Catharina Elisabeth Muth.1

Citations

  1. [S292] Ulrike Bachmann, Bachmann Research, 02 Jul 2001.