Roger Molzahn

M
Reference=0010.A.1.2
     He was born. He is the son of Fredrich J. Molzahn and Dorothy Evelyn De Nier.1

Citations

  1. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Family Group Record.

Rosalia Molzahn1

F, b. 12 September 1826
Reference=0020.B
     She was born on 12 September 1826 at Komierowo, West Prussia.1 She was the daughter of Christian Molzahn and Anna Catherine Krajecka.1

Rosalia Molzahn was baptized on 16 September 1826 at Waldau, West Prussia. Sponsors: Laurenz Jarbyski, Marianna Polowszykowa.1

Rosalia Molzahn was also known as Malzan.2

Rosalia Molzahn married Johann Brzuszczyk, son of Petri Brzuszczyk, on 22 November 1846 at Komierowo, West Prussia.3

Rosalia Molzahn witnessed the baptism of Joannes Szczepanski circa 10 October 1847.3

Citations

  1. [S56] , Baptisms 1826, No. 68, Roman Catholic Parish Registers of Baptims, Marriages and Deaths for Waldau (Kr. Flatow), West Prussia, Germany; now Waldowo (Sepolno Krajenskie), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Includes Neu Waldau, Odobowo, Skarpa, Tobola, Teklanowo and others.
  2. [S56] Roman Catholic Parish Registers of Baptims, Marriages and Deaths for Waldau (Kr. Flatow), West Prussia, Germany; now Waldowo (Sepolno Krajenskie), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Includes Neu Waldau, Odobowo, Skarpa, Tobola, Teklanowo and others.
  3. [S57] Roman Catholic Parish Registers of Baptims, Marriages and Deaths for Waldau (Kr. Flatow), West Prussia, Germany; now Waldowo (Sepolno Krajenskie), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Includes Neu Waldau, Odobowo, Skarpa, Tobola, Teklanowo and others.

Rosaline Molzahn1

F, b. 1855, d. circa 1855
Reference=0010.5
     She was born in 1855 at Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin.1 She was the daughter of Adalbertus (Albert) Molzahn and Marianna Zientkowska.1

Rosaline Molzahn died circa 1855 at Watertown; died in infancy.1

Citations

  1. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Family Group Record.

Rose Molzahn

F, b. 12 February 1854, d. 7 May 1933
Reference=0010.4
     She was born on 12 February 1854 at Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin.1,2,3 She was the daughter of Adalbertus (Albert) Molzahn and Marianna Zientkowska.

Rose Molzahn lived at 404 N. Sixth St. in Watertown.1

Rose Molzahn married Jacob Engelhart, son of Jacob Engelhart and Catherina Waltersbach, on 23 November 1875 at Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Vital records incorrectly list the groom as James rather than Jacob Engelhart, and the bride as Rosa instead of Rose.1,4

Rose Molzahn died on 7 May 1933 at Watertown at age 79.1,2

Rose Molzahn was buried at Saint Henry's Cemetery on 9 May 1933 at Watertown.1

The following obituary appeared in an unknown newspaper:
     Mrs. Engelhart Is Claimed by Death Early on Sunday
     Mrs. ROse Engelhart, widow of Jacob Engelhart, died early Sunday at her home, 404 North Sixth street, after a lingering illness. She was a sister of the late Simon Molzahn.
     Born in Watertown on February 12, 1854, her maiden name was Rose Molzahn. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Molzahn and spent her entire life in and around Watertown. She was married in St. Henry's church to Mr Engelhart on November 23, 1875. He preceded her in death 24 years ago.
     Seven children survive, Mrs. Joseph Scheiber, Mrs. Joseph Koehler, the Misses Anna, Mary and Veronica Engelhart, all of Watertown. There are nine grandchildren. Three sisters, Mrs. Andrew Hertel, the Misses Celia and Margaret Molzahn of this city, and two brothers, Joseph Molzahn of Merrill, also survive.
     Mrs. Engelhart was a life long member of St. Henry's Catholic church and one of Watertown's well known women. Her death yesterday morning came peacefully and ended a long and useful life, marked by kindness and devotion to her friends and her family.
     The funeral will be held Tuesday morning from the home, with services at 9:30 o'clock in St. Henry's church. There will be a solemn requiem high mass at which the Rev. Edward Hertel of Sullivan, a nephew, will officiate. Burial will be in St. Henry's cemetery.
     Friends may call at the home this evening to pa their respects.

Rose Engelhart's obituary was printed in the Watertown Daily Times on 11 May, 1933:
Death of Mrs. Rose Engelhart
     On last Sunday Mrs. Rose Engelhart, widow of Jacob Engelhart, died at her home, 404 North Sixth Street, at the close of a long illness. She was born in the town of Watertown on February 12, 1854, her maiden name being Rose Molzahn. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Molzahn and spent her entire life in and around Watertown. She was married in St. Henry's Church to Mr. Engelhart on November 23, 1875, who died 24 years ago.
     Seven children survive, Mrs. Joseph Scheiber, Mrs. Joseph Koehler, the Misses Anna, Marv and Veronica Engelhart and Joseph and Edward S. Engelhart of Watertown, also nine grandchildren. The sisters, Mrs. Andrew Hertel, the Misses Oelia and Margaret Molzahn of this city, and two brothers, Joseph Molzahn, route 6, and John Molzahn of Merrill also survive.
     Her funeral was held Tuesday morning from her late home to St. Henry's Catholic Church, where a solemn requiem high mass was celebrated by her nephew, Rev. Edward Hertel of Sullivan, assisted by Rev. Dean Schwinn, pastor of St. Henry's church and Rev. Father Glasshauer. Mrs. Engelhart was one of Watertown's best-known and most beloved women, and called to her final reward carrying with her the blessings of hosts of friends.5

Children of Rose Molzahn and Jacob Engelhart

Citations

  1. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Family Group Record.
  2. [S97] , St. Henry's Catholic Cemetery, Church Records - St. Henry.
  3. [S152] "Notebook of Anna Molzahn Kellerman,."
  4. [S178] Wisconsin Vital Records (published).
  5. [S267] Watertown Daily Times, 11 May 1933.

Rosemary Molzahn

F, b. 3 June 1928
Reference=0010.A.2.1
     She was born on 3 June 1928 at Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin.1 She is the daughter of Gerald Paul Molzahn and Lauretta Roberta Burns.

Rosemary Molzahn was baptized on 17 June 1928 at Liber Baptismorum in Ecclesia. The baptism was witnessed by Florence Molzahn and Edwin Burns Sponsors: Edward Burns and Florence Molzahn.2

Rosemary Molzahn lived at 300 N Warren on 17 June 1928 in Watertown.2

Rosemary Molzahn married Richard Raymond Fischer on 23 November 1950 at Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.1

Children of Rosemary Molzahn and Richard Raymond Fischer

Citations

  1. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Descendants of Albert Molzahn Chart.
  2. [S98] St. Bernard's Church Records.

Simon August Molzahn

M, b. 8 February 1853, d. 3 June 1932
Reference=0010.0
     He was born on 8 February 1853 at Waldowko, West Prussia.1,2,3,4,5 He was the son of Adalbertus (Albert) Molzahn and Marianna Zientkowska.

Simon August Molzahn was baptized on 13 February 1853 at Waldau, West Prussia.6,1

Albert and Marzianna are issued a passport for their imigration to America with their children.7

Simon August Molzahn witnessed the marriage of Gregor Engelhart and Clara Wolfram on 19 October 1875 at Catholic church, Watertown, Wisconsin.8

Simon August Molzahn married Clara Nümm, daughter of Petrus Nümm and Anna Maria Alfter, on 23 November 1875 at St. Henry's Church, Watertown, Jefferson County, Wisconsin.4,2,9,5

Simon August Molzahn was a farmer on 21 December 1875 at Jefferson County, Wisconsin.

A news paper clipping. unsure of which news paper.     
Tuesday, November 23 marks the fifty -first anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Molzahn, 200 North Third street. Mr. and Mrs. Molzahn were married at St. Henry's Catholic church on November 23, 1875 and have been residents here for many years. He appeared on the census of 1880.10

Simon August Molzahn was a carpenter in 1880 at Watertown.11

Simon August Molzahn and Marianna Zientkowska lived in 1880 in Watertown, Wisconsin; Simon Molzahn's mother, Marianna (listed as Anna), was living with the family in 1880.11

Simon August Molzahn established Farmers' Home in 1886 at North Third Street, Watertown.12

Simon August Molzahn lived at n. s. Madison, 2 e. of 2nd between 1887 and 1889 in Watertown.13,14

Simon August Molzahn lived at 206 N 3rd between 1887 and 1897 in Watertown; The address of both the Saloon and the residence are sometimes listed as 200 N 3rd.15,16,17,18,19

Simon August Molzahn was a saloon owner The address of both the saloon and the residence are sometimes listed as 200 N 3rd. between 1887 and 1900 at 206 N 3rd, Watertown.13,14,15,16,18,19

From a newspaper, unknown.      
Social Doings     
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Molzahn were pleasantly surprised by a number of their friends at their home in North Third street last evening. It was in the nature of an old fashioned gathering and marked the thirteenth anniversary of their wedding. A bountiful supper was served, covers being laid for thirty. Music and dancing followed. Mr. and Mrs. Molzahn proved to be most hospitable entertainers and received the hearty congratulations of their friends on the auspicious occasion.

Simon August Molzahn co-owned Molzahn and Feisst wholesale liquors between 1893 and 1900 at 202 N 3rd, Watertown.16,17,19

Genealogy:
     11 January 1901
     Buggy Stolen
      Buggy thieves are getting in their work recently in this city. December 24th, a buggy, buffalo robe and two blankets, the property of John Buckley, were stolen from the barn-yard of S. Molzahn in N. Third street, and the same evening an old buggy was left in Nic Simon's barn-yard on Third street, which it is supposed was left there by the person who took the buggy out of Molzahn's yard. A reward of $50 is offered for information that will lead to the arrest of the thief.--Watertown Gazette.
      On the night of Dec. 29, the old buggy that was left in Mr. Simon's yard, and Mr. Buckley's buggy taken in its stead, was also stolen from where it had been left, and until last Saturday no clue was obtained to either of the missing articles. On that day however, a farmer who lives in the vicinity of the Tom Williams farm in the town of Clyman had for some time been noticing the peculiar actions of Edward Schenck, a new renter on the Williams farm, and he went to Watertown and told his suspicions to Mr. Molzahn. A search warrant was issued and Officer Pieritz and Mr. Molzahn of Watertown, accompanied by John Buckley, went to the home of Schenck and the buggy was promptly identified as the one taken from the barn-yard of S. Molzahn on the afternoon of Dec. 24th, and belonging to Mr. Buckley. The buffalo robe and two blankets that were taken with the buggy were also recovered.
     Schenck was taken to Watertown and placed in the lock-up until Monday morning last, when he was taken before Justice Stacy, and a warrant charging him with the stealing of the goods was read. The case was adjourned until to-morrow (Saturday) Jan. 12, at 9 a. m. He has a wife and several children. The family are said to be in poor circumstances.20

The following article was printed in the Watertown Daily Times as follows:
Simon Molzahn and Wife To Observe Golden Wedding
     Mr. and Mrs. Simon Molzahn, 200 North Third street, will observe their golden wedding anniversary on monday. They will be at home to their friends and Monday afternoon and evening and, since the couple are among the best known residents of this community and have many friends throughout this section it is expected that there will be many callers to congratulate them upon the happy occasion.
     Mr. and Mrs. Molzahn were married fifty years ago on Monday at St. Henry's Catholic church by the Rev. Etschmann who was then pastor of the congregation. Mrs. Molzahn before her marriage was Miss Clara Nimm of this city. She was born here and Mr. Molzahn came to this country from Germany when an infant. Except for a short time, when they resided on a farm, they have made Watertown their home and Mr. Molzahn has been engaged in business here for many years.
     The couple have one daughter, Mrs. Harry A. Kellermann of this city. There are three grandchildren, Miss Leona Kellermann and Edgar and Frank Kellermann.
     The anniversary Monday will be observed with a high mass at St. Henry's church at 9 o'clock; the Rev. Edward Hertel, a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Molzahn will officiate. He is now stationed at the St. Charles home for boys at Wauwatosa.
     A number of persons who were present at the wedding ceremony fifty years ago will join in the celebration. Mr. and Mrs. Molzahn have already received many messages of congratulation and their friends will join on Monday in extending to them their best wishes for the occasion.21

The following article was printed in the Watertown Daily Times as follows:
Simon Molzahn and Wife Married 55 Years on Sunday
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Molzahn, 200 North Third Street, observed the fifty-fifth anniversary of their marriage on Sunday. There was no formal celebration of the event, but many friends who remembered the occasion called during the day or sent messages of congratulations.
     They were married in St. Henry's church by the Rev. F. E. Etschmann who was a pastor of the congregation at the time. Mrs. Molzahn before her marriage was Ms. Clara Nimmand she was born here. Mr. Molzahn was born abroad but came here as a child and except for a few years the couple have made their home here. Mr. Molzahn was for many years engaged in business here.
     The couple have one daughter, Mrs. Harry Kellerman, and there are three grandchildren, Miss Leona Kellerman and Edgar and Frank Kellerman.
     Among those who called to commemorate the occasion were Frank Kellerman of Sheboygan and Miss Margaret Dana of Fond du Lac.21


He co-owned a Pleasure Steamer with Charles Feisst and Andrew Roegner before 1932 in Watertown. The article details the trial launch of the boat from Boomer's dam to Hahn's lake.

Simon August Molzahn lived at 202 North Third Street on 2 June 1932 in Watertown.21,12

Simon August Molzahn died on 3 June 1932 at age 79.22,23

Simon Molzahn's obituary was printed in the Watertown Daily Times as follows:
Simon Molzahn, 79, Dies Today
Ill Many Years

     Simon Molzahn, a lifelong resident of Watertown and vicinity, and one of the best known men in this section died early today at his home at 206 North Third street after a lingering illness of eleven years. He was 79 years of age. For the past two months he was confined to his bed.
     Mr. Molzahn was born in Germany on February 8, 1853, being a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Albert Molzahn who settled in this section in 1855. In 1875 he married Miss Clara Nimm of this city. They lived on a farm until 1886 when they moved to Watertown. In that year Mr. Molzahn established the Farmer's Home in North Third street.
     He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Harry Kellermann of this city and three grandchildren, Miss Leona, Edgar and Frank Kellermann also of Watertown. There are four sisters, Mrs. Andrew Hertel, Mrs. Rose Engelhardt, Miss Margarete Molzahn and Miss Celia Molzahn of this city and two brothers, John Molzahn of Merrill and Joseph Molzahn of Watertown.
     Mr. Molzahn was one of the best known residents of the city and his friendship extended far and wide beyond the limits of the city. He numbered hundreds of farm residents in this section as personal friends, his place of business in years past having been a popular stopping place for rural folk.
     Funeral services will be held Monday morning with a solemn high mass at 9:20 o'clock at St. Henry's church. The Rev. Dean F. X. Schwinn, [unknown], will act as deacon, the Rev. Alle Klopetke, Clyman, subdeacon and the Rev. Edward Hertel, a nephew, will be the celebrant.
     Friends may call to pay their respects at the Molzahn home beginning Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock.21,22

Simon August Molzahn was buried at St. Henry's Catholic Cemetery on 6 June 1932 at Watertown, Wisconsin.12

Simon Molzahn's obituary was printed in the Watertown Gazette on 9 Jun 1932:
Death of Simon Molzahn
     Another of Watertown's most esteemed pioneer residents in the person of Simon Molzahn has passed away, his death taking place early on Friday morning, June 3, 1932, June 3, 1932, at his home 202 North Third street, where for the past two months he has been confined to his bed. On February 8, 1853, he was born in Germany, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Albert Molzahn, who settled in this section in 1855. In 1875 he married Miss Clara Nimm of this city. They lived on a farm until 1886 when they moved to Watertown, and Mr. Molzahn established the Farmers' Home in North Third Street. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Harry Kellermann of this city and three grandchildren, Miss Leona, edgar and Frank Kellermann also of Watertown. There are four sisters, Mrs. Andrew Hertel, Mrs. Rose Englehardt, Miss Margaret Molzahn and Miss Celia Molzahn of this city and two brothers, John Molzahn of Merrill and Joseph Molzahn of Watertown. His death is sincerely mourned by a very large acquaintance who hale him in very high esteem and mourn his death sincerely. Funeral services were held Monday morning with a solemn high mass at 9:30 o'clock at St. Henry's church. The Rev. Dean F. X. Schwinn, paster, was the deacon, the Rev. Albert Lkoptke, Clyman, subdeacon and the Rev. Edward Hertel, a nephew, was celebrant. The interment was in St. Henry's cemetery.12

The following article was printed in the Watertown Daily Times in July 1958:
Old Simon Molzahn Building Here Undergoing Remodeling
WAS AMONG CITY'S LEADING SALOONS DURING BUGGY ERA
     A building that has become almost a landmark in Watertown is being remodeled. For many years it was known as the Simon Molzahn block, at the corner of North Third and Madison Streets. In an era which was dominated by the horse and buggy rather than motor cars, it was operated as a saloon by the Simon Molzahn and later it was continued by Mr. Molzahns's son-in-law, Harry Kellerman.
     Mr. and Mrs. Kellerman now occupy one of the apartments on the second floor of the building and the Surdick Plumbing Co., as well as the Kellerman Agency, are also quartered on the main floor.
     For many years the building was the home of the C.A. Feisst Wholesale and retail liquor establishment, when the late Charles A. Feisst owned and operated the business. He specialized in fine liquors and imported wines cordials. Mr. Feisst made regular trips to Europe to arrange for imports.
     In his day row upon row of barrels and kegs of whiskey, plus huge casks of whiskey in the basement occupied the place.
     In the early lays there were stables to the rear of the building where farmers inhitched and stabled their horses while they attended church services in the city or spent the day shopping with their families.
     The remodeling of the building will include a new front and the old cupola which for many years dominated the top corner of the building has been removed.
     The saloon which the late Mr. Molzahn operated for so many years and which his son-in-law operated later is now a tavern known as the Hobrau and is operated by Elmer F. Schmidt.21 He was New Tag The following article was printed in the People and Places from Watertown's Past section of the Watertown Daily Times:
Beer and Lunch Features of Early Day Saloons
By Evelyn Rose
For the Daily Times
     Quote from Watertown Daily Times, March 22, 1933: "It is more than 13 years ago that the curtain of prohibition rolled down upon this city, a city widely known for the number and caliber of houses where the amber beverage, to appear soon for the next act, quenched the thirst of many an individual who sought health and enjoyed a glass of beer."
     This article will not deal with the "next act" or even the days without the "amber beverage" but rather will take the reader back to the halcyon days of the free lunch counter, when 51 saloons, not taverns, served the Watertown populace. To quote one gentleman, "we paid 5 cents for a glass of beer and had 95 cents worth of free lunch with it." The 1917 city director listed one restaurant - Otto's Inn, run by Otto Schott as a combination restaurant and beer parlor, a place of high order operated on a strict basis. For many years Otto's Inn was a popular dinner spot for Milwaukeeans enroute home from University of Wisconsin football games.
     One of the best known and well patronized places during the days of the elaborate free lunch was at 200 North Third Street. Known as the Kellerman building, it has been purchased by the M & I Bank of Watertown, and will be razed for the eventual expansion of the bank's drive-in facilities. The history of this family-owned business goes back to 1888 when Simon Molzahn purchased his first one story corner building. Molzahn is pictured, center, in front of the building with his dog. Hitching posts and the old gas lamp are also shown.
     In 1892 Molzahn moved the small building to the back of the lot and a new brick building was erected. For a time Molzahn was in business with C. A. Feisst in the new building. Feisst operated the wholesale liquor business in the rear of the building, and Molzahn ran the restaurant in front. A long row of wine kegs is shown in the second picture. After the end of prohibition, Kellermans rented the place to Elmer and Beats Schmidt, who were tenants and operators of the tavern.
     Harry Kellerman, a native of Marinette, moved to Watertown in 1897. He married Anna Molzahn, Simon's daughter, in 1902. They joined her father in operation of the business. The couple had three children and celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1952. Before prohibition the popular saloons, with elaborate and tasty free lunches, were known for miles around.
     Frank and Edgar Kellerman, trustees for their mother's estate, told of their parents' reminiscences and their own memories of days past. During the construction of the large brick building the family lived in the original small one in the back of the lot. The new building had living quarters in the second story. Along the north and west sides of the large lot there were stables with oat bins for more than 50 horses. Balance of the space was used for parking patron's carriages, wagons and sleighs. A family entrance was at the back of the building. Here family members were welcome to come in and order lunch, which would be brought to them. Women and children never did go into the bar proper.
     It is difficult for us today to even imagine that all these fine lunches were free - lunches with a variety of meats, roasted turkey and the like. Patrons paid for the beer, the lunch was free. Mrs. Harry Kellerman roasted the turkeys.
     Another popular gathering place was the Deutsches Dorf, located at Third and Main streets, present site of the Electric Company offices. It was always a rendezvous for politicians and businessmen. The phrase "I'll meet you at the corner" meant the Deutsches Dorf. This name was carried back from the German Village at the 1893 Chicago World Fair. The Deutsches Dorf, one of the elite, was never listed under 'saloons,' it appeared only in regular alphabetical listings in capital letters. The place had a reputation for good beer and good liquor, cod and hot free lunches. Orchestras were imported to entertain. It was operated by Grover Glasser, John Gruel and G. M. Gahlman. Gahlman was also listed under Gahlman & Harte Agency and the Watertown Canning Co.
     After 1917 saloons were never mentioned in the city directory, they never came back. When prohibition was repealed in 1934, legislation made the saloons taverns. After that the city directory listed 45 taverns, a few restaurants, no saloons.
     The Ohm brothers, Ernest and Fred, operated their establishment at 200 South Second Street, present location of the Ford garage and the former Electric terminal. The brothers provided sheds for customers' horses and rigs. The Ohms were the men who purchased Concordia Island and named it Tivoli, a name that never changed. They enclosed a pavilion, added some rooms, opened a bowling alley and beer parlor. Tivoli was named after an Italian pleasure resort near Rome, Italy, which is still there. At least it was a few years ago.
     It seemed in the years before 1919 there must have been a saloon at almost every other corner. John Guetzlaff had one at 110 North Third Street, Edward Boigt had his at 109 North Third Street, across the street. Marble Hall was and establishment operated by the Waukesha Brewing Co. on North Third Street. Here, too, free lunches were available.
     We feel sure someone will call and ask why we didn't mention so and so's fine operation and elegant lunches. We only have room to mention five or six. Remember, there were 51 saloons operating in Watertown in pre-prohibition days.
     Ernst J. Meyer, Madison Capitol Times columnist about 50 years ago, wrote about Jack Kehoe's wine cellar in Watertown's Seventh Ward. Meyer said the grounds, cellar and house were spic and span. Kehoe had come home from the war, missed his wine, studied wine making, planted grapes and made his own wine. He sold a little here and there and then his fame grew. This was a forbidden undertaking during prohibition days.
     Meyer wrote, "It was good wine. Professors and businessmen and their wives drove to Kehoe's wine cellar from Madison and Milwaukee. They drank his good wine, sang songs, played on the one-lunged organ, and had enjoyable evenings, no loos parties." Meyer stressed that Kehoe had been a good host. "But as was proper," the author continued in a sad and reminiscent way, "the law caught up to Kehoe and he was given a fine and four months in jail. This is fair and just because he broke the law. But I have shared his hospitality, I would like to share his days in jail, where he languishes because he, a criminal, made wine for a hundred of us upright and self-righteous people to drink." on 30 January 1982 at Watertown.21

Child of Simon August Molzahn and Clara Nümm

Citations

  1. [S58] Archives of D.F. Kellerman Permission to leave document, 990 (11 March 1854), Chicago, Illinois, USA.
  2. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Family Group Record.
  3. [S97] , St. Henry's Catholic Cemetery, Church Records - St. Henry.
  4. [S278] Letter, Leona Kellerman Chesemore to Dana Kellerman.
  5. [S484] Unknown applied to, unknown subject.
  6. [S56] Roman Catholic Parish Registers of Baptims, Marriages and Deaths for Waldau (Kr. Flatow), West Prussia, Germany; now Waldowo (Sepolno Krajenskie), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Includes Neu Waldau, Odobowo, Skarpa, Tobola, Teklanowo and others.
  7. [S293] Albert Molzahn Passport Approval.
  8. [S97] , Cemetery Records, Church Records - St. Henry.
  9. [S103] Death Record.
  10. [S350] 1880 Census.
  11. [S350] 1880 Census, Simon Molzahn household.
  12. [S132] Watertown Gazette, 9 Jun 1932.
  13. [S207] Watertown Directory 1887.
  14. [S208] Watertown Directory 1889.
  15. [S209] Watertown Directory 1892-1893.
  16. [S210] Watertown Directory 1893.
  17. [S211] 1895 Watertown Directory.
  18. [S212] Watertown Directory 1897.
  19. [S213] Watertown Directory 1899-1900.
  20. [S78] Juneau, Wisconsin, Telephone.
  21. [S68] Watertown Daily Times.
  22. [S268] Roberta Fosdal, "Roberta correspondences," e-mail to Dana Kellerman, Letter; 24 June 1997.
  23. [S312] Wisconsin Death Certificate.
  24. [S68] Watertown Daily Times, 16 Feb 1976.

Walter Molzahn1

M, d. after 26 October 1976
Reference=0010.A.1.4
     He was born. He was the son of Fredrich J. Molzahn and Dorothy (?).1

Walter Molzahn died after 26 October 1976.2

Citations

  1. [S59] Rosemary Molzahn Fischer, "Fischer FGS", Family Group Record.
  2. [S68] Watertown Daily Times, 26 Oct 1976.

Allison Monahan1

F
     She is the daughter of Terry Monahan and Gail Slaymaker.1

Citations

  1. [S470] Brian Mark Funeral Homes, 24 June 2010, http://www.schoenfeldmark.com/obituary_details.cfm?id=244

Brianne Monahan1

F
     She is the daughter of Terry Monahan and Gail Slaymaker.1

Citations

  1. [S470] Brian Mark Funeral Homes, 24 June 2010, http://www.schoenfeldmark.com/obituary_details.cfm?id=244

Maureen Monahan1

F
     She is the daughter of Terry Monahan and Gail Slaymaker.1

Citations

  1. [S470] Brian Mark Funeral Homes, 24 June 2010, http://www.schoenfeldmark.com/obituary_details.cfm?id=244

Terry Monahan1

M
     Terry Monahan married Gail Slaymaker, daughter of John Slaymaker and Shirley Cronk.1

Citations

  1. [S470] Brian Mark Funeral Homes, 24 June 2010, http://www.schoenfeldmark.com/obituary_details.cfm?id=244

Charles E Monroe1

M, b. 1857, d. 1931
     He was born in 1857.1

Charles E Monroe married Marie (Mimmie) Jussen, daughter of Edmund Jüssen and Antonie Schurz, in 1924.1

Charles E Monroe died in 1931.1

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work."

Hugh T Moore1

M
Reference=0027.7.7.2*
     He married Maybelle Husting, daughter of Gustav Binsfeld Husting and Paula Ruedebusch, on 15 June 1940.1,2

Children of Hugh T Moore and Maybelle Husting

Citations

  1. [S35] Fond du Lac Daily Reporter, 20 Sep 1968.
  2. [S217] Mayville, 12 Sep 1996.

Kathy Moore1

F
Reference=27.7.7.2.1
     She is the daughter of Hugh T Moore and Maybelle Husting.1

Kathy Moore married Rick Maxfield.1

Citations

  1. [S217] Mayville, 12 Sep 1996.

Mary Moore1

F
Reference=27.7.7.2.2
     She is the daughter of Hugh T Moore and Maybelle Husting.1

Mary Moore married Dave McKeith.1

Citations

  1. [S217] Mayville, 12 Sep 1996.

Alexander G Morehouse1

M, b. 1940
     He was born in 1940.1 He is the son of M. Dutton Morehouse and Louise Lackner.1

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work."

Elizabeth Morehouse1

F, b. 1946
     She was born in 1946.1 She is the daughter of M. Dutton Morehouse and Louise Lackner.1

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work."

M. Dutton Morehouse1

M, b. 1906
     He was born in 1906.1

M. Dutton Morehouse married Louise Lackner, daughter of Francis A Lackner and Clara L Kirchhoff, in 1935.1

Children of M. Dutton Morehouse and Louise Lackner

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work."

M. Dutton Morehouse Jr.1

M, b. 1936
     He was born in 1936.1 He is the son of M. Dutton Morehouse and Louise Lackner.1

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work."

Ilse Morgenstern

F, b. 22 February 1919
Reference=0008.1.3.A*
     She was born on 22 February 1919 at Schweichein bei Herford W, North-Rhein Westphalia.1

Ilse Morgenstern married Franz Kellermann, son of Franz Kellermann and Maria Degenhardt, on 18 July 1941.1

Child of Ilse Morgenstern and Franz Kellermann

Citations

  1. [S40] Adolf Kellermann, "Kellermann-Degenhardt Pedigree."

Lena Morgridge

F
Reference=cD0930
     She married Earl Lueck, son of Albert Lueck and Meta Krebs.

Catherine Moritz1

F
     She witnessed the baptism of William Edward Weber on 13 January 1895 at St. Mary's Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.1

Citations

  1. [S119] Church Record, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 1866-1920.

Joseph Moritz1

M
     He witnessed the baptism of Eleanore T. Weber on 24 May 1885 at St. Mary's Church, Fond du Lac; She was baptised Theresa Eleanore, but was always known as Ella.1

Citations

  1. [S119] Church Record, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, 1866-1920.

Mary Morris

F, d. 29 March 1966
Reference=0015.1.6*
     She married Cornelius Georg Weber, son of Gebhard Weber and Maria Margret Husting.

Mary Morris died on 29 March 1966 at 2621 E. Shorewood Blvd, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin.1

Mary Weber's obituary was printed in an unknown Milwaukee paper:
Weber, Mary Morris
2621 E. Shorewood blvd., Mar. 29, 1966, aged 71 years, beloved wife of Cornelius G. Weber, mother-in-law of Audrey; 4 grandchildren and other relatives also survive. Services 1 p.m. Thurs. at Fass Funeral Home, 3601 N. Oakland av. Interment Union cemetery, Theresa, Wis. In state from 4 to 8 p.m. Wed.2

Mary Morris was buried at Union Cemetery on 31 March 1966 at Theresa, Theresa County, Wisconsin.3

Child of Mary Morris and Cornelius Georg Weber

Citations

  1. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work", Unkown Newspaper Obit.
  2. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work", Unknown Newspaper Obit.
  3. [S440] Paula Jussen, "P. Jussen's Work", Unknown Milwuakee Paper Obit.

Anna Morse1

F, b. circa 1828, d. 30 August 1908
Reference=cD1175
     She was born circa 1828 at England.1

Anna Morse married George Caswell.1

Anna Morse died on 30 August 1908 at Sharon, Mercer County, Pennsylvania.1

Children of Anna Morse and George Caswell

Citations

  1. [S79] John W. Jordan, Genealogical and personal history of the Allegheny Valley, Pennsylvania.

Donna Beatrice Morse1

F
     She married Robert Zetwick, son of Clayton Fidele Zetwick and Sadie Clara Rider, on 18 June 1950.1

Citations

  1. [S323] "Hastings Gazette", Ancestral File, 7 Jan 1999.

Constance Gene Moser1

F
Reference=0027.3.2.2.5
     She is the daughter of Major Ernest Moser and Alice Husting.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Major Ernest Moser1

M
Reference=cD0917
     He married Alice Husting, daughter of Walter Eugene Husting and Corina Gardien.1

Children of Major Ernest Moser and Alice Husting

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

James Allen Moser1

M
Reference=0027.3.2.2.5
     He is the son of Major Ernest Moser and Alice Husting.1

Citations

  1. [S327] Leo Husting, "Descendents of Michael Husting", Ancestral File.

Louis Motsch1

M, b. circa 1744
     He was born circa 1744 at Rubenheim.2 He was the son of Mathieu Motsch and Barbe Weber.3

Louis Motsch married Catherine Becker before 19 January 1794.3

Louis Motsch married Christine Schmitt, daughter of Henri Schmitt and Catherine Klingler, on 19 January 1794 at Wittring, Sarreguemines, Moselle, Lorraine.2

Louis Motsch married Catherine Stuner on 19 May 1808 at Wittring, Sarreguemines, Moselle, Lorraine.3

Citations

  1. [S2] Adolphe Gambs, Table des Mariages enregistrés à Wittring (Canton de SARREGUEMINES) 1714-1832, 398 mariages, Page 7.
  2. [S2] Adolphe Gambs, Table des Mariages enregistrés à Wittring (Canton de SARREGUEMINES) 1714-1832, 398 mariages, pp. 7, 15.
  3. [S2] Adolphe Gambs, Table des Mariages enregistrés à Wittring (Canton de SARREGUEMINES) 1714-1832, 398 mariages, pp. 15.